THE CONNECTICUT GENERAL ASSEMBLY

THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013

On Wednesday after the first Monday of January, A. D. , 2013, the date prescribed by the Constitution of the State of Connecticut for the meeting of the General Assembly, the House of Representatives convened in the Representatives' Hall in the Capitol at Hartford, Connecticut, at the hour 10: 10 o'clock, in the forenoon.

Representative Christopher G. Donovan of the 84th District, Speaker of the preceding House, called the House of Representatives to order.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Will the House please come to order.

Members, please find your seats. I know they've moved them around, so see if you can find your seat and please be seated.

The House, please come to order.

Pursuant to Article 3 of the Constitution of the State of Connecticut, I hereby convene this House session.

Will be member select, staff and guests please rise and direct your attention to the dais where Assistant House Chaplain Garland Higgins will lead us in prayer.

ASSISTANT CHAPLAIN REVEREND GARLAND D. HIGGINS:

Let us pray.

Oh, Thou in whose presence my soul takes delight, on whom in affliction I call. My comfort by day and my song in the night, my hope, my salvation, my all.

Almighty God, if ever we needed Your wisdom and guidance it is now. As our Legislature begins a new session standing upon the threshold of a new year help them to make laws that are fair and just. May they be forever steadfast in their commitment to Your people and the oath that is taken.

Dear Lord, bring peace and unity to a body of people who are different until yet being different makes no difference. Bless the families of the Sandy Hook community and God bless our State.

Amen.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Amen.

Will Representative Mary Mushinsky of the 85th District and Representative Art O'Neill of the 69th District please come to the dais and lead the Chamber in the Pledge of Allegiance.

REP. MUSHINSKY AND REP. O'NEILL:

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

I would now like to welcome Maureen Urso of Wethersfield to the dais to sing the National Anthem.

Maureen.

The National Anthem was performed by Maureen Urso of Wethersfield, Connecticut.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Thank you, Maureen. Wonderful job. Thank you so much. Thank you for adding to our opening day.

It's my honor to appoint Ann Clark as our temporary Clerk until we have the election of the House Clerk which will take place later in the day.

I will ask members that everybody please be seated. Thank you.

I will ask members that when your name is called by the temporary Clerk that you rise standing in place until all the members are called upon. Got that? Stand and stay? So you can all be sworn in.

I would also ask that guests please hold your applause until after all the members' names are called.

And with that, Madam Clerk.

THE CLERK:

Good morning and congratulations. The Roll of the House of Representatives, January Session, 2013.

District 1, Matthew D. Ritter.

REP. M. RITTER (1st):

Present.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Yes, you could say, present or here.

THE CLERK:

And remain standing, please.

District 2, Dan Carter.

REP. CARTER (2nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 3, Minnie Gonzalez.

REP. GONZALEZ (3rd):

Present. ]

THE CLERK:

Assembly District 4, Angel Arce.

REP. ARCE (4th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 5, Brandon McGee. District 5, Brandon McGee.

REP. McGEE (5th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 6, Edwin Vargas.

REP. VARGAS (6th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 7, Douglas McCrory.

REP. McCRORY (7th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 8, Tim Ackert.

REP. ACKERT (8th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 9, Jason Rojas.

REP. ROJAS (9th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 10, Henry J. Genga.

REP. GENGA (10th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 11, Timothy Larson.

REP. LARSON (11th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 12, Jeff Luxenberg.

REP. LUXENBERG (21th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 13, Joe Dominico.

REP. DOMINICO (13th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 14, Bill Aman.

REP. AMAN (14th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 15, David Baram.

REP. BARAM (15th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 16, John K. Hampton.

REP. HAMPTON (16th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 17, Timothy B. LeGeyt.

REP. LeGEYT (17th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 18, Andrew M. Fleischmann.

REP. FLEISCHMANN (18th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 19, Brian Becker.

REP. BECKER (19th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 20, Joe Verrengia.

REP. VERRENGIA (20th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 21, Mike Demicco.

REP. DEMICCO (21st):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 22, Elizabeth Betty Boukus.

REP. BOUKUS (22nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 23, Marilyn (inaudible) -- Giuliano.

REP. GIULIANO (23rd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

Giuliano, I'm sorry.

District 24, Rick Lopes.

REP. LOPES (24th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 25, Robert Bobby Sanchez.

REP. SANCHEZ (25th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 26, Peter A. Tercyak.

REP. TERCYAK (26th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 27, Sandy Nafis.

REP. NAFIS (27th):

(Inaudible. )

THE CLERK:

District 28, Russell A. Morin.

REP. MORIN (28th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 29, Antonio Tony Guerrera.

REP. GUERRERA (29th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 30, Joe Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 31, Prasad Srinivasan.

REP. SRINIVASAN (31st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 32, Christie M. Carpino.

REP. CARPINO (32nd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 33, Joseph C. Serra.

REP. SERRA (33rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 34, Melissa H. Ziobron.

REP. ZIOBRON (34th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 35, Tom Vicino.

REP. VICINO (35th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 36, Philip J. Miller.

REP. P. J. MILLER (36th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 37, Ed Jutila.

REP. JUTILA (37th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 38, Elizabeth B. Ritter.

REP. E. RITTER (38th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 39, Ernest Hewett.

REP. HEWETT (39th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 40, Edward Moukawsher.

REP. MOUKAWSHER (40th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 41, Elissa T. Wright.

REP. E. WRIGHT (41st):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 42, Timothy R. Bowles.

REP. BOWLES (42nd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 43, Diana S. Urban.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 44, Mae Flexor.

REP. FLEXER (44th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 45, Steven Mikutel.

REP. MIKUTEL (45th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 46, Emmett D. Riley.

REP. RILEY (46th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 47, Brian H. Sear.

REP. SEAR (47th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 48, Linda A. Orange.

REP. ORANGE (48th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 49, Susan Johnson.

REP. JOHNSON (49th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 50, Mike Alberts.

REP. ALBERTS (50th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 51, Daniel S. Rovero.

REP. ROVERO (51st):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 52, Penny Bacchiochi.

REP. BACCHIOCHI (52nd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 53, Brian Hurlburt.

REP. HURLBURT (53rd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 54, Gregory Haddad.

REP. HADDAD (54th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 55, Pamela Z. Sawyer.

REP. SAWYER (55th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 56, Claire L. Janowski.

REP. JANOWSKI (56th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 57, Christopher Davis.

REP. DAVIS (57th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 58, David Alexander.

REP. ALEXANDER (58th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 59, David William Kiner.

REP. KINER (59th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 60, Peggy Sayers.

REP. SAYERS (60th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 61, Elaine O'Brien.

REP. O'BRIEN (61st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 62, Bill Simanski.

REP. SIMANSKI (62nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 63, Jay M. Case.

REP. CASE (63rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 64, Roberta B. Willis.

REP. WILLIS (64th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 65, Michelle L. Cook.

REP. COOK (65th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 66, Craig A. Miner. ]

REP. MINER (66th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 67, Cecilia Buck-Taylor.

REP. BUCK-TAYLOR (67th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 68, Sean Williams.

REP. WILLIAMS (68th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 69, Arthur J. O'Neill.

REP. O'NEILL (69th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 70, Rosa C. Rebimbas.

REP. REBIMBAS (70th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 71, Anthony J. D'Amelio.

REP. D'AMELIO (71st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 72, Larry B. Butler.

REP. BUTLER (72nd):

Glad to be -- here.

THE CLERK:

District 73, Jeffrey J. Berger.

REP. BERGER (73rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 74, Selim G. Noujaim.

REP. NOUJAIM (74th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 75, Victor Cuevas.

REP. CUEVAS (75th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 76, John Piscopo.

REP. PISCOPO (76th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 77, Christopher A. Wright.

REP. C. WRIGHT (77th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 78, Whit Betts.

REP. BETTS (78th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 79, Frank N. Nicastro, Sr.

REP. NICASTRO (79th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 80, Rob Sampson.

REP. SAMPSON (80th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 81, Dave Zoni.

REP. ZONI (81st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 82, Emil Buddy Altobello.

REP. ALTOBELLO (82nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 83, Catherine Abercrombie.

REP. ABERCROMBIE (83rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 84, Hilda E. Santiago.

REP. H. SANTIAGO (84th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 85, Mary M. Mushinsky.

REP. MUSHINSKY (85th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 86, Vincent J. Candelora.

REP. CANDELORA (86th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 87, David Yaccarino.

REP. YACCARINO (87th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 89, Lezlye Zupkus.

REP. ZUPKUS (89th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 90, Mary G. Fritz.

REP. FRITZ (90th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 91, Michael C. D'Agostino.

REP. D'AGOSTINO (91st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 92, Patricia A. Dillon.

REP. DILLON (92nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 93, Toni Edmonds Walker.

District 93, Toni Edmonds Walker.

District 94, Gary Holder-Winfield.

REP. HOLDER-WINFIELD (94th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 95, Juan Candelaria.

REP. CANDELARIA (95th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 96, Rowland J. Lemar.

REP. LEMAR (96th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 97, Robert W. Megna.

REP. MEGNA (97th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 98, Patricia M. Widlitz.

REP. WIDLITZ (98th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 99, James M. Albis.

REP. ALBIS (99th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 100, Matthew L. Lesser.

REP. LESSER (100th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 101, Noreen S. Kokoruda.

REP. KOKORUDA (101st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 102, Lonnie Reed.

REP. REED (102nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 103, Al Adinolfi.

REP. ADINOLFI (103rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 104, Linda M. Gentile.

REP. GENTILE (104th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 105, Theresa W. Conroy.

REP. CONROY (105th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 106, Mitch Bolinsky.

REP. BOLINSKY (106th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 107, David A. Scribner.

REP. SCRIBNER (107th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 108, Richard A. Smith.

REP. SMITH (108th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 108, Richard A. Smith.

REP. SMITH (108th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 109, David Arconti, Jr.

REP. ARCONTI (109th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 110, Robert Godfrey.

REP. GODFREY (110th):

Still here.

THE CLERK:

District 111, John H. Frey.

REP. FREY (111th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 112, DebraLee Hovey.

REP. HOVEY (112th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 113, Jason Perillo.

REP. PERILLO (113th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 114, Themis Klarides.

REP. KLARIDES (114th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 115, Stephen D. Dargan.

REP. DARGAN (115th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 160, Lewis P. Esposito, Jr.

REP. ESPOSITO (116th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 117, Paul Davis.

REP. P. DAVIS (117th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 118, Kim Rose.

REP. ROSE (118th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 119, James Maroney.

REP. MARONEY (119th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 120, Laura R. Hoydick.

REP. HOYDICK (120th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 121, Terry Backer.

REP. BACKER (121st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 122, Lawrence G. Miller.

REP. L. MILLER (122nd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 122, Lawrence G. Miller --

District 123, David Rutigliano.

REP. RUTIGLIANO (123rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 124, Charles Don Clemons, Jr.

District 124, Charles Don Clemons, Jr.

District 125, Tom O'Dea.

REP. O'DEA (125th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 126, Charlie L. Stallworth.

REP. STALLWORTH (126th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 127, John Hennessy.

REP. HENNESSY (127th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 128, Christina M. Ayala.

REP. AYALA (128th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 129, Auden Grogins.

REP. GROGINS (129th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 130, Ezequiel Santiago.

District 130, Ezequiel Santiago.

District 131, David K. Labriola.

REP. LABRIOLA (131st):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 132, Brenda L. Kupchick.

REP. KUPCHICK (132nd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 133, Kim Fawcett.

REP. FAWCETT (133rd):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 134, Tony Hwang.

REP. HWANG (134th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 135, John T. Shaban.

REP. SHABAN (135th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 136, Jonathan Steinberg.

REP. STEINBERG (136th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 137, Chris Perone.

REP. PERONE (137th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 138, Janice R. Giegler.

REP. GIEGLER (138th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 139, Kevin Ryan.

REP. RYAN (139th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 140, Bruce V. Morris.

REP. MORRIS (140th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 141, Terrie E. Wood.

REP. WOOD (141st):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 142, Lawrence F. Cafero, Jr.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 143, Gail Lavielle.

REP. LAVIELLE (143rd):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 144, Mike Molgano.

REP. MOLGANO (144th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 145, Patricia Billie Miller.

REP. P. B. MILLER (145th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 146, Gerald Fox, III.

REP. G. FOX (146th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 147, William Tong.

REP. TONG (147th):

Here.

THE CLERK:

District 148, Daniel J. Fox.

REP. D. FOX (148th):

Present. ]

THE CLERK:

District 149, Livvy Floren.

REP. FLOREN (149th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 150, Stephen G. Walko.

REP. WALKO (150th):

Present.

THE CLERK:

District 151, Fred Camillo.

REP. CAMILLO (151st):

Present.

THE CLERK:

I will again call the roll. I will call the members who did not answer the first roll.

District 93, Toni Edmonds Walker.

District 124, Charles Don Clemons, Jr.

District 130, Ezequiel Santiago.

Mr.  Speaker, that concludes the call of the roll.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Will the members elect please stand -- or you're already standing. Right? Raise your right hand, please.

You do solemnly swear or affirm that you will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Connecticut so long as you continue to be a citizen thereof, and that you will faithfully discharge according to law the duties of the office of State Representative to the best of your abilities so help you God.

REPRESENTATIVES:

I do.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Congratulations.

We have some pretty fancy visuals -- so much for the red and green light.

Still have some more business to do, Representatives.

Nice to see all the family members and guests here. Welcome.

In a few minutes I will take a seat here and join Connecticut's former Speakers of House. And I'd like to introduce the former Speakers who are here with us today.

Jim Amann, Speaker Amann.

Speaker Moira Lyons, Moira.

Speaker Tom Ritter.

And Speaker Richard Balducci. Richard.

I'd also like to recognize fresh from swearing people in in the Senate, our Secretary of State Denise Merrill. Denise.

When I was elected Speaker of the House four years ago my speech focused on family. The members of this Chamber, the House, we're family. And to our newest members, incoming freshmen, welcome to our legislative family. To our veteran members, welcome home. Welcome home.

And to families, friends and guests, it's great to see you here. Thank you so much for your support so much. It's very helpful.

It's been my honor to be a State Representative for the 84th District in Meriden over the past two decades, and Speaker of the House for the past four. To my colleagues and friends on both side of the aisle, and all the staff, thank you for your support, thank you for your dedication and thank you for your friendship.

Just like 20 years ago, the air in this Chamber is crackling with excitement, ideas and optimism and over the course of my legislative career I never lost that optimism. We can make a difference in this room. We can make things better and we can do great things.

As a Chamber, as a State, as a community we are at our best when we work together; everyone pitching in and treating each and every one of us with fairness, dignity and respect. Following the golden rule, protecting the vulnerable and moving our people forward, that's when we're at our best.

Together we've made significant improvements, cleaning our environment, cleaning our air and recycling, reducing toxic chemicals, rehabbing brownfields, initiating mass transit -- especially Newhaven/Springfield train, let's go -- passing measures to combat domestic violence, raising compensation for the lowest-paid workers, expanding health care, ensuring access to health care, cooperating to create jobs, helping businesses, advancing civil rights for all our residents and honoring and helping our veterans.

We've improved our schools, providing more opportunities for our youth to learn, establishing publicly financed elections allowing any citizen the means to run for office. And like a family, we constantly work to support our children, protect our elderly and provide for those with disabilities.

All these advances happen because people in this Chamber made them happen. We work with our constituents, the chamber upstairs, governors and advocates. And I look forward to what you will do next, my representatives.

Speaking of what's next, let's turn to page -- I'll turn this one -- and focus on the man who will be Speaker --

It says here turn to page -- yeah.

-- Brendan Sharkey is an incredibly dedicated public servant with the heart of a policy wonk. Brendan has the mind of a valedictorian and the sense of humor of a class prankster. As Majority Leader, Brendan stood up for his State and his caucus and has been at my side for many, many important decisions and historic negotiations. He's a leader and will serve this Chamber well and I am so thrilled that he will be our next Speaker.

In closing, I want to thank you for the honor of being your Speaker for the last four years. Thank you for this incredible opportunity to represent and serve our community.

All the best to my friends. Do good things. Thanks.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thanks so much.

All right. The next order of business is the election of the Speaker of the House. Are there any nominations? Any nominations?

I call on House Majority Leader Joe Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Good afternoon, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Good afternoon, Joe. It's good to see you.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

It's good to see you up there. And again, on behalf of the Chamber we thank you for your many years up there, Chris. You were a true friend to us all. When we needed to talk you were always there to listen. You always helped us out. So thank you again on behalf of this Chamber.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Thank you, Joe. You'll do a great job as Majority Leader. I'll be following you guys and make sure you doing everything right. I'll give you a call if you're not. So --

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

And if I step out of line, sir, please come back and just let me know.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

And then you'll ignore me, but that's okay.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

It is my great pleasure to rise today and placing the name of Jay Brendan Sharkey into nomination for the Speaker of the House of this General Assembly.

All of us know Brendan. All of us love Brendan. My very first year here in the General Assembly I was crammed into the middle of a row like many of you freshman are here today. And sitting behind me was Brendan. And next to Brendan was Toni Walker, and if you know both of them they do, as Chris mentioned, like to joke around.

So every now and I would hear a little giggle coming from behind me. And I'd hear Toni say, yeah, that's good, Brendan. Go ahead. That's good. That's perfect. And then other times I would hear a deep discussion about the bill we were focusing on.

So Chris, you were very accurate. I mean, Brendan really has those characteristics and there were struggles that he was faced with here in the chamber and it presented opportunities for him. And he stepped up and showed those true colors as a leader.

We moved on though our legislative career, Brendan moved on, I think, to P and D. I moved on to a deputy speaker, but then we were reunited last year right here in this area. I sat right in front of Brendan. Now the pressures were quite different.

The pressures of being a Majority Leader for this Chamber, juggling all the needs of this caucus, taking care of the bills that we want all pushed and he sat here and handled it again. The giggles every once in a while, but then that serious debate that needed to happen on the behalf of all the members here.

It's very rare that you find a leader with those qualities and maintain them, even if the most difficulties. We all know the last few days of session the phone is going back and forth with Larry and the Majority Leader, the Speaker, and still Brendan maintained that. Those are the qualities that you really want to see.

You want to see somebody who can build consensus. He did that in this very seat. You want to see somebody that's a good listener. As I said, he did that in this seat. Fair, I think that's all we ask. I think all of us, as Larry always says, represent around 24,000 people. Alls we want is fairness. Brendan has that attribute. Brendan is the person that will take these challenges that we currently face and turn them into opportunities for all of us.

When I was asked to do his nominating speech I thought about it a lot. And I thought, what an honor it will be, because every now and then you have these snapshots of time to where you can make that difference. We are in one of those snapshots now. Brendan is that leader and it gives me great pleasure to rise in place his name into nomination and I urge adoption of that.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Thank you, Mr.  Majority Leader.

Are there any further nominations? The name of Jay Brendan Sharkey has been placed in nomination.

For our seconding speech, House Minority Leader Larry Cafero. Lawrence, you have the floor, sir.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Ladies and gentlemen of the Chamber, today is a day we actually see our Constitution played out literally. Our Constitution calls for us to gather on this day to raise our right hands and to take an oath that is prescribed by that very document.

And our first order of business is to elect a Speaker, the entire Chamber elect a Speaker. I have the privilege of being the Minority Leader elected by my caucus; representative Aresimowicz elected by his caucus. But this is an election that we all take part in and it's one I think we all take very, very seriously.

It is my pleasure and honor to second the nomination of Jay Brendan Sharkey. As Minority Leader I got to know Brendan far better when he served the last two years as Majority Leader. Leaders tend to get together over a lot of stuff and have a lot of conversations, some of them heated, some of them very friendly.

But over the course of time you take the measure of the person that you're dealing with, and it's my opinion that the gentleman we are about to elect is a fine, decent and fair man. He's a person that has the utmost respect for this institution, has the utmost respect for each and every one of us regardless of our political party, regardless of where we are from and regardless of our beliefs.

Many times in the course of dealing with Brendan Sharkey over the last two years I watched that fairness play out. I know in many instances where things that he personally did not believe in but defended to his death the right for each and every one of us to stand up and be heard, and as the Majority Leader indicated, that's all we could ask for, certainly on this side of the aisle.

We ask that the Speaker recognize the fact that each of us, as Joe indicated, represent about 24,000 people. This side of the aisle, collectively over a third of the State of Connecticut. And regardless of how votes go on that, these gorgeous new tote boards that we have, he recognizes the fact that each of us have a right to speak on behalf of our constituency and he has never trampled on that right.

You know, on some occasions when we're doing some negotiating in the back room -- the first time Brendan took me back to his office, he took me over to a picture that he showed me with great pride. It was a picture of his father, who he lost at age 17, shaking hands with Roy Wilkins, the famous civil rights leader. And he told me the story about his father, how his father in World War II was put in command of an all-black troop; in those days of course the armed services were segregated.

And the respect and understanding that Brendan's dad had for African Americans in this country and how he took that respect and understanding and brought it to the corporate world and did great things with regard to affirmative action to the point where he was recognized by civil rights leaders, such as Roy Wilkins. And he told me that story beaming with pride, and I think that is certainly -- it was clear to me where he got his love and respect for government and the government process.

I have been blessed as Minority Leader to serve under some wonderful men and women as Speaker and I think Brendan is certainly going to continue in that wonderful tradition. He's become a dear friend and I think he will become a great Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to second the nomination of Brendan Sharkey for our speaker.

Thank you.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Thank you, sir.

Thank you, Representative Cafero. Good to see you my friend.

Are there further nominations? Are there further nominations? Hearing none, I declare that nominations are closed. There being only one nominee, I direct that the temporary Clerk please cast one ballot for Representative Jay Brendan Sharkey as the Speaker of the House.

THE CLERK:

Mr. Speaker, the ballot has been cast.

SPEAKER DONOVAN:

Representative Sharkey is the next Speaker of the House.

Congratulations, Representative Sharkey.

At this time I would like to appoint four representatives to wait upon and escort the Speaker Elect to the dais to be sworn in. For that purpose I would appoint Representative Aresimowicz, Representative Cafero, Representative Backer and Representative Bacchiochi. If you would please escort the new Speaker in.

The oath of office will now be administered by former House Majority Leader Robert Frankel and witnessed by Diane Reynolds.

ROBERT FRANKEL:

Representative Sharkey, would you please raise your right hand?

Do you Jay Brendan Sharkey solemnly swear or affirm that you will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Connecticut so long as you continue as citizen thereof, and that you will faithfully discharge according to law the duties of the office of State Representative and the duties of the high office of Speaker of the House of Representatives to the best of your abilities so help you God?

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

I do.

ROBERT FRANKEL:

Congratulations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much.

To start I just need to tell you all, that given the nomination speeches there I had one small thing to do before I was escorted out by the committee, and that was when the Committee came back to the office in the back to escort me to the chamber, I hid in the bathroom. It took them a little while to find me, but we worked it all out.

Thank you all for your support and your support for me as Speaker. There are a few thank yous that I need to make today right now, right at the beginning of my speech before I go any further.

First and foremost, I want to thank the love of my life who is sitting behind me with her beautiful daughter Emily, Diane Reynolds.

Diane's courage, her support has been an inspiration to me and I'm looking forward to spending the rest of our lives together. So thank you.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Awe.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

And I also want to recognize and introduce you to some members of my family, many of you may know that I'm the youngest of seven and depending upon which -- who you talk to, whether it was my parents when I was growing up or my siblings -- I was the youngest and there was a gap between me and the next oldest.

So according to my parents I was a blessed expected addition to the family, being a good Irish Catholic family. But if you asked my siblings, I was the bad mistake that never really worked out. So either way many of them are here today.

And you may remember two years ago we were lucky enough -- I was lucky enough to have my mother here, who at the time was in failing health. But she managed to make it here for the opening day when I was sworn in as Majority Leader where Representative Aresimowicz sits. And she has since passed away, but I know that both she and my father, to whom Representative Cafero so graciously referred, are looking down today. So I need to acknowledge them first and foremost.

I also want to acknowledge all the folks who are here from my family here today, not all of whom could be here. Beginning with my oldest brother Tommy, who is an infamous educator in the state of Massachusetts who came down from Boston. For those of you who are education advocates, he's the guy to talk to because they really look up to him in Massachusetts.

My sister Eileen from Stanford who has been one of the -- along with my other sister Mary Lee, can be the deflation mechanism that I need in public office. She does that job well, as does my sister Mary Lee; her husband Joseph.

By the way, Joseph my brother-in-law Joe Gaffney played rugby with our Governor at -- when he attended Boston College. So there are a few good drinking stories I gather that are going to be coming our way. So if you'd like to get that information from him he'll be available after the session today.

And some of you may know that my stepson is overseas serving our country in the Connecticut National Guard. His wife Dawn is here on his behalf along with my two gorgeous step grandchildren, Megan and Coralyn, so if you could welcome them all. Thank you.

I also obviously want to thank both Representative Aresimowicz and Representative Cafero.

Joe, you're going to do a terrific job as Majority Leader. We'll get to that later on in festivities today, but you are a tremendous leader. You've demonstrated that throughout all the time that I've known you. And you're right, you picked up on a lot of things sitting in front of me including that tendency to also want to play a few games here and there. So hopefully I trust that you won't be losing that spirit as well in your new role.

And Larry, as Minority Leader, you're right. We have spent a lot of time together getting to know each other on a very personal level. And I really appreciate the comments that you made about my dad. It was very heartfelt. Had to have the tissues in the back. Unfortunately I didn't have them for my siblings when they were here.

But it's also a measure of the man to recognize, for you to have been able to recognize that about me and it's something that -- it's a friendship that we formed and it's one that I deeply treasure. And I look forward to our next two years together -- and in your role as well, absolutely.

I also want to thank the former Speakers who are here, Speaker Tom Ritter, Speaker Balducci, Speaker Lyons, Speaker Amann and all of you who have been a guide for me throughout my time here. And I especially want to thank our ongoing Speaker Chris Donovan.

Chris, as we've all been saying and I think recognizing, as Majority Leader there was no better example of a leader that you could have than Chris Donovan. Not only is he a fun guy and a great guy to get to know, but he's also the best negotiator I've ever met. I've learned so much from him from that standpoint.

And he's also a man who cares nothing more than protecting every last person in our state and he has demonstrated that and stayed true to that commitment throughout his career. And we hope that you -- this is not the end of your career in public office or in the public setting, but you leave here with the warmth and admiration of everyone in this Chamber.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I also feel it's important to acknowledge and thank the staff, my own staff personally led by my chief of staff Maureen Magnon who's no stranger to you all, I'm sure. And to the rest of the team, David Velez, Gabe Rosenberg, Ricky Baltimore, and our legal staff and all of the rest of the House Democratic staff as well as the staff from the minority side.

I mean, this place runs smoothly because of all of you and we want you to know how much we appreciate the work that you put in here, the long hours that you dedicate to all of us to make us all look good. And also to the nonpartisan staff who do such a tremendous job in protecting all of us from doing bad things. That's their job -- by mistake of course.

So I want to just extend a special thanks to all the staff people from both sides of the aisle who made this day possible, so thank you.

And I also finally want to extend my thanks to all of you, all of the members of this House who have supported me throughout my career and are supporting me today for Speaker.

As the Minority Leader mentioned in his speech, for those here in the Chamber and for those watching elsewhere, the Speaker is uniquely elected by all the members of the House. And so I'm grateful for the trust that all of you have placed in my ability to lead this entire Chamber; I hope to and I promise to do that in a fair manner.

You know, when friends ask me -- folks who are not necessarily familiar with politics or how this place operates -- and they ask me, what's it like to be in public office? What's it like to hold a leadership position? And I think they expect that I'm going to respond with a statement about, well it's tough. You know, you've got to compromise your values. You have to really, you know, make a lot of tough choices and leave a lot of -- some of your values behind in an effort to get to the greater good. That's what they expect.

I respond to them by saying, I consider myself to be the luckiest guy on earth. Ever since my first year here in this Chamber I've been surrounded by smart, dedicated people and people who are doing this for the right reasons, a couple of whom are actually right behind us today and with us today.

As a part-time Legislature every one of us brings our own expertise, our own experiences to this job with the understanding that there are other things in our lives as well as being a legislator. And I tell them that ever since being a new legislator I have felt nurtured by more seasoned veterans who have helped me realize that I should hold onto the things that I care about and I should continue to pursue the things that make me feel so strongly about serving the people of Connecticut.

And I tell those friends that this is a unique place, it's a family place, as the speaker mentioned, where doing the right thing usually trumps politics and where standing for your convictions is respected.

As we've all watched over the last weeks, and years even, at the continuing dysfunction in Washington, I've heard many people say the way our -- the folks and our friends and colleagues in Washington in the United States Capitol should perhaps look a little bit to the northeast, to this state's capital for a guideline as to how government can and should be done. Here under the gold dome and in this magnificent chamber we've managed somehow to tackle the State's toughest challenges in an environment of respect without rancor or recrimination.

We all have our respective perspectives on how things should be done and we've all been sent here by our constituents to espouse those views, but as we do so we have managed to avoid the toxic. There's no curtain, iron, lace or otherwise that divides this Chamber between the majority and the minority party. It's somewhere over there, but we don't know quite exactly where it is.

And sometimes in those moments when temperatures get a little bit too hot, we somehow manage to cool it down. I hope Representative Cafero doesn't mind -- it's already been discussed that the phones between the Majority and the Minority Leader sometimes buzz with a call to one or the other talking about a concern about what one of our respective members may be saying on the floor, or maybe even just a heads-up as to what they're going to say at some point.

Sometimes that requires more than a phone call. Sometimes it requires a casual walk across the aisle to one desk or another, to just have a face-to-face. And in those times when even that may not work we pause in this Chamber and we meet right there in the well, all of us to solve the problem and move us forward.

Now there's a friend of mine in Hamden who has a phrase I'd like to quote sometimes, that this really isn't rocket surgery. It's what the people expect us to do. It's what the people expect us to do if we are going to do their business. And that expectation for what we are to do has probably never been more important than today as we cope with the responses to the tragedy our state endured last month in Newtown.

So it is in that spirit that I ask all of you for what I've asked each person I've appointed to a chair or a committee, or to survive my leadership team, and that is simply to treat each other with the respect we all deserve and continue to make bipartisanship the rule, not the exception. It's the one legacy I hope to be measured by as Speaker when my tenure is through. So I'm asking each one of you to please help me make that happen.

Now finally, I would be remiss if I didn't express one other sentiment on this terrific day as I accept this gavel. When I did the practice session on this I actually dropped the gavel into the well, so I promise not to do that.

So here's the sentiment that I want to describe, and tell me if you agree -- but really this is awesome. Isn't it? This is awesome. Right?

I mean -- and I, of course I don't mean -- and I hope you don't take that to mean that it's just for me, because obviously awesome is -- this is an awesome thing to do, to become Speaker. But I mean for all of us, this is truly awesome.

I mean, look at this beautiful room. Look at these ceilings. Look and think about even things like your desk and all the people who have sat there and all the history that has been made in this chamber over the years.

And heck, I mean, look even at that beautiful tote board. Huh? I mean that's, you know, wow. We're still in debate as to whether we should keep the screen up or not, but we'll get to that.

And probably most importantly, look at the families and friends who are all here to support us. Think about how hard we all worked to get here and how much our friends and families and loved ones have sacrificed to enable us all -- all to be here today. Whether this is your first term or your 15th, if you're not in awe today, maybe you picked the wrong vocation.

So soak it all in. And for one last time give yourselves, and probably most importantly, your loved ones and your friends a round of applause for making all this possible today.

All right. Okay. That's enough. We've got work to do. Come on.

And whatever you do, as things get tough this year and in the years ahead don't lose that sense of awe that you feel today. For you freshman this is the day you always remember and cherish it. We have an awesome responsibility given to us by our constituents and it's only with the humility that comes with that sense of awe that we can ever truly do our jobs well.

So thank you and God bless the awesome State of Connecticut.

Well, our next order of business today, having taken care of those festivities, is to introduce our Majority and Minority Leader. I have the distinction of introducing to this Chamber Representative -- first Representative Joseph Aresimowicz, our Majority Leader.

As I mentioned earlier, Joe, you've -- we've been here for quite some time it seems and we've been through a lot good and bad on behalf of the State of Connecticut. And you have consistently demonstrated your leadership capability, which in my mind is second to none. It's something that our caucus has recognized in making you the Majority Leader and I think that's well, deserved.

You come at it, as I mentioned, from a perspective which does not -- which is helpful, but does not also cloud your judgment as to what you believe is right for the State of Connecticut. I think you're going to do a terrific job as Majority Leader. I congratulate you on your new position and I look forward to working with you.

So Joe Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

And it is quite nice to say that for the first time to you, Mr. Speaker. Your kind words really do mean a lot to me and we did become close. And I'm sure we will grow closer over the next couple years, and as Larry said, through the tough negotiations.

My position is slightly different from yours; is a caucus position. And I think anytime -- and I said that on the night that you elected me and I'll say it again here tonight, anytime that any of us put our name on the ballot -- many of us in this room have done it for many years -- it's an experience that you're very nervous about.

Do the folks think that I am the person that could, whether it's on a town council, a board of ed, serve them the best? So I want to thank all of the members of my caucus for trusting in me to do this position to help run the floor, to assist Speaker Sharkey and the many tough issues that we have in the coming year. It really was a humbling experience getting to know many of you a lot better and I really do appreciate your support. So first and foremost, thank you to all of you for your support for me. Thank you.

Representative Cafero, I think we're going to have a great relationship. One of the our mutual friends that I brought on my opening day is here again with me today. It's your old college roommate. So -- and that's Rick Degroth down in the front row. Larry, you remember him well.

So I'm hoping as with some of the stories that Brendan's brother-in-law could have about the Governor, Rick may share with me of you. So while we're negotiating I may have to mention one or two. Rick, we'll talk afterwards.

But Larry is right; 24,000 members we all represent and we're all going to have a voice in here. The pledge, the offer of a pledge that you extended, Brendan, I fully accept it will be the rule of fairness and discussing things in a manner that's respectful of others' opinions. So I accept. Thank you.

Also all of us come up here at great cost to our own time, especially our family time. It's tough. We all have to have that -- the backbone back home because there's many times where we're up your long hours debating many issues. A lot of things can really get forgotten at home. So today in the Chamber I'm joined by a few members of my family that really do keep me grounded.

When I come up here for the debates and really think, we're all that, you know, we know a lot of stuff, we go home. They're there to remind me to take out the trash and to do the dishes and mow the lawn. And they're also there to give me that hug when times are really tough.

Down in the well of the House is also the love of my life. We'll be celebrating 20 years together in a few weeks, my wife Crystal Aresimowicz in the front row.

And also my three kids. There's Michael, Kaitlyn and Ryan -- are also in the front row. Thanks for coming up.

I came from, not as large a family, but there was four of us. I have my twin sister Sherry and Shelley here, and my brother Jim wasn't able to make it; they're down in the well.

I think the next one is going to be a little bit tough for me, and the person down in the front row may be a little bit tough on her -- so maybe I'm setting her up a little bit. Joining me also in the well of the House is my mother's business partner, Maryanne Scroy. Most of you know this past spring I lost my mom, so she's not here with us today in person. But as Brendan said, I know she's here with us in spirit.

My Mom and Maryanne spent many great years together. They actually formed a small accounting firm when women owners of a business were the exception and not the rule and they strived together.

And my mother was my life compass. I proudly admit to everybody that I'm a mama's boy, and that's okay. And so I thought it was really important to have Maryanne here with us today because, you know, every -- I'm also a football coach and, you know, when the starting player goes down there's got to be that substitute on the bench to step up.

So Maryanne, you've been nominated. You're the substitute. You're coming in as the backup mom and you'll be taking over the role as that life compass. So Maryanne Scroy, my mom's business partner. I want to thank her.

So in closing let me say this, those of you that know me I'm typically not the person that it's about me. So this position I think suits me very well because for the next two years it's going to be about all of you. It's about ensuring that you have the success, ensuring that I give you the tools to be successful. And then we are successful as a caucus, we're successful as a General Assembly and we work well with the other side. I think we have something we all can be proud about.

So thank you very much for this day. For me it means a great deal, but tomorrow, as Betsy Ritter said yesterday, it's time to get to work. So I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. It means the world to me. Thank you.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Representative Aresimowicz. And welcome to all your loved ones who are here in the well of the House. We're going to need some -- I don't know, maybe we could get the staff to get some tissues up here on the dais before the end of --

Thank you, and congratulations.

Secondly, I want to introduce to all of you our distinguished Minority Leader Lawrence Cafero.

Now I know that Larry is itching to start his speech because that's what Larry, as we all know, does best here in this Chamber. And I hate to say it this way, but, you know, we can't ignore the fact that of all of the leadership, in this Chamber any way, Larry is our senior member. Geez, sorry about that.

But honestly, I think as -- in addition to our relationship as friends which I discussed earlier, your role as Minority Leader I think has really elevated this entire place. You have brought to this Chamber a sense of respect and a sense of seriousness about the job that we all have before us and you have done it in a way that is not looking for those recriminations. It's not looking for a leg up in an effort to try to make a point that is not consistent with the overall policy that you're trying to achieve.

You've been a great partner and you have led your caucus I think admirably since you've taken over as Minority Leader and I am so looking forward to working with you over these next two years.

Representative Larry Cafero, our Minority Leader.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and it's a privilege to call you that. Congratulations to you.

And I also want to congratulate my friend Joe Aresimowicz on being elected Majority Leader. Joe, you are a fine man and we've had the opportunity to work together before. And I know how fair and honest you are and I look forward to developing that relationship with you as Minority and Majority Leader. So congratulations to you.

And ladies and gentlemen, congratulations to each and every one of you. You know, so many of the things I want to say have been said, but I encourage you once again, look around. Drink it in. Look at this beautiful, magnificent building, this magnificent room.

Look around and think about, as the Speaker indicated, the history, the decisions that went on in this room, the people who preceded us, the serious times and the problems that were addressed in this room. Think about that.

Look around you. Look at the people in this room. Look around to some of your colleagues -- I say this to, especially the newest members of our Chamber -- look around because you are looking at some of the finest people you will ever meet in your life and some of the best friends you'll ever have.

And I don't care how old you are, or on how much maybe you've been around the block. I know I came here 20 years ago -- my God. And I thought, well, I'm blessed with all the friends I need, et cetera. Well, boy was I wrong. I had the opportunity to address the freshman in orientation and I told you then I have met some of the most incredible people who are my lifelong friends.

Look around to the people who accompanied you here, again as the Speaker said, your family. They got you here, folks. They're going to keep you grounded. Don't forget them. Don't forget them. Because there are going to be a lot of empty seats at that dinner table and missed recitals and soccer games and they need to understand why you are not there. You need to make them part of this process because they are so important to all of us.

Take care of your health, your mental and physical health. I've been here long enough that I've seen a lot of empty chairs from time to time in this Chamber of colleagues that we have lost. Please take care of yourself. It's a stressful job. It's a tough job, so take care of yourself and remember your family.

Also remember your roots. Remember where you came from. If you ever forget look at that number. Think what it represents. This is a beautiful, beautiful city, the capital city and we do some beautiful things here, but we're only here because of the people back home. Don't ever, ever forget that.

We have some enormous challenges ahead. And I know that this is the brand-new 2013-2015 legislative session, but I know many of you, your eyes were upon this very room just three weeks ago when we as a State, still mourning the tragedy of Newtown, got together to pay tribute to them immediately followed by the deficit mitigation vote in that special session.

At that time I had the opportunity to talk about what I called the spirit of Sandy Hook, a spirit that came upon both sides of the aisle, both chambers, the Governor's office; that took place where we put aside our differences, where we put party and politics and power aside and put people first and we came to an agreement. That spirit of Sandy hook, in my opinion, was responsible for the action that we took on December 19th.

And I guess as I did in that day I'll ask once again in this brand-new session, when we're full of hope and optimism, that we carry that spirit of Sandy Hook forward. That could be our greatest tribute to those heroes and angels who sacrificed their life back in Newtown. That could be our greatest tribute to respect each other's opinion, to be tolerant, to listen, to be patient, to be kind, to be giving. And if we could do that we will start off this session, no matter how big our problems are -- and they're big -- we could do it and solve them together and that's what I hope for.

I wish you all the best of luck, the best of health. Let's get to know each other because in this room we're going to be celebrating a lot of things as well and recognizing. We recognize the passing of former colleagues, the passing of family members, the births and weddings and anniversaries and birthdays, et cetera. We're going to be spending a lot of time in this room together, folks. So let's get to know each other and we could do good things.

Ladies and gentlemen, I talked so much about family and I am very blessed, as we all are, to have family with us today. And I want to take this opportunity to introduce my family. There's been a lot of talk about loves of their life; I want to introduce mine.

This blessed woman, thank God, a little -- about 30 years ago said, yes, when I asked if she'd spent the rest of her life with me.

And she said, yes -- I don't know what she was thinking either, but thank God she did. Ladies and gentlemen, my best friend and my wife Barbara Cafero.

My wife has been very successful in business over 30 years, but regardless of her successes and mine, are our three greatest accomplishments -- are also with us here today. I want to introduce you to all three of them starting with our eldest, our University of Virginia graduate and now in the financial industry in New York City, my beautiful daughter Jacqueline Anne.

Stand up.

My next -- notice I tell you where they graduated from only because it reminds me how many less tuition payments I have.

My eldest son who is a graduate of the University of -- George Washington University, Washington D. C. , is now a practicing and performing actor in New York City, my son Christopher Lawrence.

And my baby, who's actually the singer in the family. He recently appeared on an episode of the Office and is also -- has a cameo in the film Pitch Perfect. He is in his third year at the University of Virginia -- 13 more tuition payments to go -- my baby Nicholas Joseph.

And I also want to recognize I am especially blessed to -- yesterday I celebrated my 55th birthday and to be able to share this day with both your parents is a special blessing. So ladies and gentlemen I want to introduce you to the people who made sure that I am here by having me, and that is my mother and father.

My father, who I'll introduce first, Dr. Lawrence Cafero is going to be 93 years old in March. He retired on November 28th. He retired on November 28th and -- from his third career after 78 years of working, ladies and gentlemen, my father Larry Cafero, Sr.

And finally, my compass, Joe, my compass, my buddy, my -- oh, she's just everything. She's mom. I will not dare tell you how old she is because I will hear about that, but ladies and gentlemen, indulge me. To me, one of the most wonderful people in the world, my mother Helen Cafero.

Thank you so much.

Lastly, I want to thank my caucus. I want to thank my caucus for once again giving me one of the greatest honors a person can have, and that is the privilege to lead you in this legislative session. I thank you so much. I love you all. We are a family. And well, I look forward to the next two years.

Mr.  Speaker, Mr.  Majority Leader, thank you so much for this opportunity. God bless. Thank you.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

Thank you, Representative Cafero and congratulations again. And welcome to all of your loved ones who are here in the well. Thank you for being here today with us all.

At this point we are going to be announcing and introducing members of our leadership team and I get the privilege of introducing my Deputy Speakers who we appointed just a couple of weeks ago. And we'll do this in alphabetical order.

I want to first introduce you to Jeff Berger, State Representative starting his seventh term from the great city of Waterbury. If you'd stand, Jeff.

Jeff has been a leader on economic development as the former chairman of the Commerce Committee. And I wanted to make sure that we gave him a significant leadership role because those are going to be the issues I think ultimately that are going to define the next two years.

Also no stranger to this Chamber, in his 13th term from the great hat city of Danbury, Representative Bob Godfrey.

There's a reason why we refer to him as the Mad Hatter, and it doesn't have to do with the fact that he comes from Danbury. But Bob is obviously our senior -- well, he's senior, yeah. But he's also our senior expert in terms of what we do here and how we do it. And he's been a terrific guide to me throughout my time here. He's been a National Leader in the Council of State Governments and I'm honored to have you continue on our team as Deputy Speaker.

Next is from the great city of New London, Representative Ernie Hewett.

Ernie is starting his fifth term and he and I have been through thick and thin together. And he was one of my Deputy Majority Leaders and I'm honored and proud to have him join me here on the Speaker's dais. So thank you, Ernie, for sticking with me.

Next in our -- again, no stranger to this Chamber, in her ninth term from the great town of, not Cowchester, but Colchester, Representative Linda Orange.

Linda, also known as the female Steve Dargan, has been a leader on public safety issues for many, many years and she has done a terrific job as Deputy Majority Leader under past speakers, including Chris Donovan. So I'm grateful that you're willing to stick around and be one of my deputies as well. Thank you, Linda.

Next, in her fifth -- starting her fifth term, Representative Betsy Ritter from the great town of Watertown -- Waterford, sorry. I always do that. Waterford. Sorry. The great town of Waterford. Let's give a hand for Waterford.

I plucked Betsy from her chairmanship of the Public Health Committee because she has done such a tremendous job there and has shown such leadership, not only on committee issues, but on other issues that are of importance to her constituency. She's probably one of the smartest people in this building and I'm looking forward to having her be one of my partners going forward.

So thank you, Betsy.

And on the aisle, starting his eleventh term from the great town of Montville, the great Deputy Speaker, really great Deputy Speaker Kevin Ryan. Yeah. Kevin is turning red, which was the intended effect. Thank you, Kevin, for following through.

Kevin has obviously -- to all of us, we know, has demonstrated a tremendous leadership, again on behalf of his constituents and on the issues that he cares about. And as Deputy Speaker under Chris Donovan he has been a tremendous guide to me and a friend as well. So I'm grateful that you were able to also join me on my leadership team. So thank you, Kevin.

And last but not least, from the great town of Windsor Locks, none other than Representative Peggy Sayers.

When I asked Peggy to be my Deputy Majority Leader two years ago she was so thrilled and she continues to have that energy and passion and is so happy to be here and be able to help in all the ways that she does. You've been a -- also a tremendous support for me throughout my time here and someone that I've really looked up to and appreciated. And again, your intelligence and equanimity and your ability to lead on tough issues is something that's second to none. So I really appreciate the fact that you're also going to be able to be with me as a Deputy Speaker. So thank you, Peggy.

And with that, Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Thank you very much, Mr.  Speaker.

And I have the pleasure also of introducing my leadership team. Very great individuals. It was actually -- I think for Brendan, probably too -- it's always difficult when you have to just select a few of many of the great leaders that we have in this room. I consider us all leaders, but we do have to narrow it down.

So joining me in the Deputy Majority Leader ranks this year, and we will also go alphabetically, will be from Juan Candelaria who's starting his sixth term here at the General Assembly. Stay up.

He's a Representative from New Haven's 95th District. One of the strong things to me that really persuaded me to reach out to him was his strong advocate for children's issues. You know, he's worked on the committee before with Representative Urban. You know, he's an advocate that we need fighting for us and it really was my pleasure to name you to the team. I look forward to serving you with you, Juan. Thank you.

I think my first challenge is trying to find the seat -- so I think Michelle is back here somewhere. Okay. So one of my other Deputy Majority Leaders will be Michelle Cook from Torrington.

Michelle and I have been friends since we came in. We hit it off right away, again sitting in the area -- really seat mates help, folks. Really, you're going to get to know the folks around you. It's a lot of long hours. So Michelle and I were near each other. We became great friends right away.

She was very instrumental in the domestic violence task force, also overarching children -- see what my interest really is? Great advocate and it's a pleasure to welcome to our team also Michelle. Thank you.

Now Paul, I know you're right behind me. So Paul Davis, and he represents Orange and he's starting his fifth term here at the General Assembly.

Paul, it really is a great pleasure. We came in together. I saw all your work, especially in the area of environmental and just a strong advocate for your district in the General Assembly. And it is my pleasure to welcome you to the team. I look forward to serving with you.

Also Auden Grogins who's directly in front of us.

Auden represents Bridgeport's 129th District and she has the best story of all. Auden, I hope you don't get mad if I tell it. It's really my pleasure to welcome her to the team, but today as she was coming in the building; she has the typical smile that she always does. And I think she walked by -- was it the Lieutenant Governor? With a great big smile on her face and says, I'm a Deputy Majority Leader.

So that's the kind of enthusiasm we need and it's my pleasure to make her that Deputy Majority Leader. Thank you so much, Auden.

Representative Gary Holder-Winfield.

Also hailing from New Haven, starting his third term and I think for all of us in the Chamber we know if I was just to say, a strong advocate, that would be a severe understatement. He brings that passion to the table. He really brings a lot of knowledge on the issues in particular, but it's the passion that we all know him for. And Gary, it's a pleasure to name you as the Deputy Majority Leader and I really look forward to serving with you also, sir.

Russ Morin, Representative Russ Morin from Wethersfield.

He had a couple bills last year some of you may remember. Just maybe a little debate here and there on some voter issues. And other than being a great person, a really good friend and wanting him on the team I really had to save him from the GAE committee. So I have now named him as my Deputy Majority Leader, Russ, and I look forward to working with you. Thank you.

Representative Sandy Nafis from Newington.

It's helpful that it falls alphabetically, too but -- I'm sorry. I think I really did save the best for last in my opinion. Sandy, you've been an incredible friend to many of us in the Chamber. And as I look up on the dais at Denise I smile because I actually saw Sandy in action and she was a Deputy for Denise. And I think all of us are real comfortable with Sandy. Sandy will be my go-to person here. Sandy, it really was a great pleasure to name you as a Deputy Majority Leader and I look forward to serving with you. Thank you.

I also have the great pleasure of calling out the names of the rest of our Majority Leader team. I would ask that you hold your applause to the end. There is a great many of them.

It's -- the Speaker and I really work well together and I think we're going to work well with this group of people that we have here. And there are many titles. It is a long list, so I'm going to go through them real quick. And please stand and we'll hold the applause until the end.

Charles Don Clemons of the 124th District will be the majority caucus chair.

Elizabeth Betty Boukus of the 22nd District will be the deputy majority caucus chair.

Minnie Gonzalez of the 3rd District and Steve Mikutel of the 45th District shall be majority whips at-large.

Brian Hurlburt of the 53rd District, Bruce Morris of the 140th District will be deputy majority whips at-large.

Doug McCrory and Ezequiel Santiago shall be deputy majority whips.

Terry Backer of the 121st District, Pat Dillon of the 92nd District, Roland Lemar of the 96th District, Pat Billie Miller of the 145th District, Phil Miller of the 36th District, Ted Moukawsher of the 40th District, Elaine O'Brien of the 61st District, Kim Rose of the 118th; those will be the assistant majority whips.

We also have the assistant majority leaders and that would be James Albis of the 99th District, Kim Fawcett of the 133rd, Mae Flexer of the 44th, Henry Genga of the 10th, Tim Larson of the 11th District, Matt Lesser of the 100th District, Frank Nicastro of the 79th, Bobby Sanchez of the 25th, Charles Stallworth of the 126th, Elissa Wright of the 41st.

That I think, Mr.  Speaker, I think is the entire leadership team that you've selected, sir.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Well done.

And at this time for the purposes of introducing his leadership team I recognize the Minority Leader, Representative Larry Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr.  Speaker.

Majority Leader Aresimowicz, congratulations to you again and to all your leadership team. Look forward to working with you.

As both have said, none of us leaders could do this alone. We depend on a lot of people and certainly on our leadership team and it's my pleasure to introduce mine.

First and foremost, I want to introduce my deputy leaders and start with someone who's been with me since I was privileged enough to become Minority Leader. She's a dear close friend. There's nothing in my opinion she can't do and I would trust her with my life, and that's my dear friend Representative Themis Klarides.

I'd also like to introduce my other deputy. He is the wonk. He keeps us honest with the numbers and he's also going to take over as our screening chair, Deputy Leader Vincent Candelora.

I'd like to introduce our deputy leaders at-large. Always having my back is the dean of our caucus, a person who I think is universally respected on both side of the aisle, Representative Art O'Neill.

And the next deputy leader is somebody I call sis' affectionately. We came in together 20 years ago and we just took our 11th oath of office together and we are dear friends. And she has been an enormous help to me and our caucus, ladies and gentlemen, Pam Sawyer.

I would also ask now the rest of the leadership team, as I call your names to please stand. And as the Majority Leader indicated, maybe we could hold our applause until the end.

Each and every one of the people I'm about to introduce bring a unique perspective to our caucus leadership team and I could not do this job without them. And we could not do what we do in this side of the aisle without them. So I'd like to start with our House Republican Caucus Chairman Penny Bacchiochi.

Our House Republican Whips John Piscopo, Tony D'Amelio David Labriola, John Frey and Selim Noujaim.

Our assistant Republican leaders, Mike Alberts, Bill Aman, Livvy Floren, Jan Giegler, Marilyn Giuliano, DebraLee Hovey, Craig Miner, Jason Perillo, David Scribner and Sean Williams.

Mr. Speaker, ladies and gentlemen, the House Republican leadership team. Thank you so much.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Mr.  Minority Leader.

I also omitted -- between the Majority Leader and I -- we omitted three folks who are also really key to our leadership team who I omitted. It's my fault. Our assistant deputy speakers, these are folks who have been here for quite some time and who are not strangers to any of us, but have ascended to a leadership role that I think we also need to recognize.

One of course is my dear good friend from the 90th District and the great town of Wallingford, Representative Mary Fritz.

From the great city of West Haven, the -- one of the more seasoned folks on our team and someone who's been a terrific friend and supporter, Representative Lou Esposito.

And also, last but not least, my dear friend from Meriden who also has been a terrific friend and someone who I've leaned on many times for advice and consultation, from the city of Meriden, Representative Buddy Altobello.

So with that, the next order of business is the election of the House Clerk.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker?

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I'd like to place the name of Martin Dunleavy of New Haven in nomination to serve as the House clerk.

Mr.  Dunleavy actually started in this very Chamber, Mr. Speaker, as bulletin clerk; moved on to an amendment clerk. Stayed very active around the building through many of us, very active in many causes both here and down in D. C. So it's kind of coming circle for him, Mr. Speaker.

I really urge this Chamber to adopt. Marty is a great guy and I think he'll serve the chamber well.

Thank you, sir.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, sir.

Representative Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, it's my honor to second the nomination of Martin Dunleavy. We had the opportunity to chat yesterday. And it was funny; Martin came in wearing very proudly -- and I respect that -- a wonderful tie that had the Democratic symbol on it. And I congratulated him on his new role and I said that will be the last time you're wearing that tie.

And to his credit he came in today wearing a wonderful tie with just the outline of the State of Connecticut all over it. Now that's a darn good clerk, if you ask me. And it's my honor to put his name, to second his nomination.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you. Thank you, Representative Cafero and just for the record he's giving up that gig on Tom (inaudible) show too to be part of our group as our Clerk.

So are there any other nominations? Are there any other nominations? Hearing none, I declare the nominations are closed. There being only one nominee, I direct the temporary Clerk to please cast the ballot for Martin Dunleavy as the Clerk of this House.

THE CLERK:

Mr. Speaker, the ballot has been cast.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Martin Dunleavy is the next Clerk of the House.

Martin, will you please come forward?

Mr.  Dunleavy, will you raise your right hand?

Do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Connecticut so long as you continue to be a citizen thereof, and that you will faithfully discharge according to law the duties of the office of the Clerk to the best of your abilities so help you God?

MARTIN DUNLEVY:

So help me God, I do.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Congratulations.

The next order of business, will the House -- will the Clerk please call and read House Resolution Number 1?

Come on, hurry up, Clerk. You've got to call the House resolution here, buddy, you know. Waste no time. You know what I mean?

Now that's pressure. Huh? Yeah.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 1, RESOLUTION APPOINTING CHARLES AUGUR OF MIDDLEFIELD AS THE ASSISTANT CLERK OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move adoption of House Resolution 1.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question before the Chamber is adoption of House Resolution Number 1.

Will you remark?

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker, yes.

Looking at the resolution we are nominating Charles Augur as the assistant clerk. He is the first selectman -- a former first selectman of Middlefield. He's a very respected attorney; Duke University. He's really looking forward to serving us here in the Chamber. I think he'll do great for the next two years.

I urge adoption, Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you. Thank you.

Will you remark further?

Representative Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, I would encourage the Chamber to adopt this resolution. The gentleman is duly qualified and look forward to working with him.

Thank you.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

Will you remark further? Will you remark further? If not, I will try your minds. All those in favor of the resolution, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Congratulations to you, Charles. Please come to the dais to be sworn in.

Would you raise your right hand?

Do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Connecticut so long as you continue as citizen thereof, and that you will faithfully discharge according to law the duties of the office of the Assistant Clerk to the best of your abilities so help you God?

CHARLES AUGUR:

I do.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Congratulations.

CHARLES AUGUR:

Thank you, Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

All right. So we're going to move on quickly now. Will the Clerk please call House Resolution Number 2 concerning the House rules.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 2, RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE HOUSE RULES, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move adoption of the resolution.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question before the Chamber is the adoption of House Resolution Number 2. Will you remark?

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, these are the House rules. These are the rules under which we operate. They are the exact same rules as last session and I urge adoption.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

Are there -- will you remark further? Will you remark further? If not, let me try your minds.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Mr.  Speaker?

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Yes, Representative.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

I'm sorry.

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

I apologize.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

I had the wrong page of the script. I want to assure the Chamber and certainly those members of this side of the aisle that the minority party was engaged in the process of developing these rules. They are, as the Majority Leader indicated, the exact same rules we ran by last year and I would urge adoption.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Representative Cafero.

Will you remark further on the adoption of the resolution? Will you remark further? If not, let me try your minds. All those in favor please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Pursuant to House Rule 32 I will appoint a Committee on Seating and the committee will be composed of Representative Lou Esposito, Representative Frank Nicastro, Representative Pam Sawyer and Representative Art O'Neill. You have a lot of work to do. Get to it. We'll come back to you in a moment.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker?

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for the suspension of our rules for the immediate consideration of House Resolutions Numbers 3, 4 and 5, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question is on suspension of our rules for the adoption of -- the immediate consideration of House Resolution Numbers 3, 4 and 5. Is there any objection to suspension? Is there any objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for the immediate consideration of House Resolution Numbers 3, 4 and 5.

Would the Clerk please call and read House Resolution Number 3.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 3, RESOLUTION RAISING A COMMITTEE TO CANVASS THE VOTES OF THE STATE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, the resolution is self-explanatory and I move its adoption.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question is on adoption. Will you remark? Will you remark? If not, I will --

Are we on the right page, Larry?

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Yeah.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Good. Got it.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Twenty-one.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

If not, I will try your minds. All those in favor, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted. And at this time I will appoint the Committee to Canvass, which will include Representative Gerry Fox, Representative Ed Jutila and Representative Themis Klarides.

Will the Clerk please call and read House Resolution Number 4.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 4, RESOLUTION CONFIRMING THE NOMINATION OF RABBI CRAIG H. MARANTZ OF GLASTONBURY AS THE CHAPLAIN OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker, I move adoption of the resolution.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question is on adoption of the resolution.

Will you remark?

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

Rabbi Marantz is well known in the Hartford community. He was ordained in 1999 at Hebrew Union College. He has his master's in education from Stanford University. He leads the congregation of Kol Haverim in Glastonbury. And I urge my colleagues to adopt this resolution.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Mr.  Majority Leader.

Are there further comments?

Representative Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

I look forward to the good Rabbi being our chaplain here. He has been a visiting chaplain quite often and has been very inspirational to the Chamber. So I would urge adoption of this resolution.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

I concur with your remarks. Thank you, Representative Cafero.

Will you remark further? Will you remark further? If not, all those in favor of the resolution, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Will the Clerk please call and read House Resolution Number 5.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 5, RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE PRINTING OF THE JOURNAL, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz again.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I believe the resolution is self-explanatory again and I move its adoption, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question is on adoption. Will you remark? Will you remark? If not, all those in favor, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Once again, Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I would ask for the suspension of our rules for the immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolutions Number 1 and 2.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question is on suspension of our rules for the purpose of the immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolution Numbers 1 and 2. Is there any objection to suspension? Is there objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for the immediate consideration of Senate Joint Resolution Numbers 1 and 2.

Will the Clerk please call Senate Joint Resolution Number 1.

THE CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution Number 1, RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE JOINT RULES OF THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, introduced by Senator Looney and Senator Aresim -- and Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Where I come from, Mr.  Clerk, that's a demotion.

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

I'm glad you said that, Mr. Speaker. I didn't have to.

Thank you. Mr. Speaker, ladies and gentlemen, these are the joint rules that govern the relationship between the House and Senate. They are the framework for our legislative process. These rules detail the committee process, the relationship between the House and the Senate and the relationship between the committees and the General Assembly.

There are some slight changes contained herein. Most of the changes are clarifying or conforming to current practices. A few of them are the kids and the Veterans Committee -- will be elevated to standing committees. I think we all in this Chamber share and understand the value of their work and I think the elevation is rightfully deserved.

Rules changes to conform to agency consolidation, something we've been laboring over for a few years here in this Chamber. The Governor has done some. It thereby affects our committee levels and we need to clarify that language.

And it also eliminates mandatory referrals to legislative management. Legislative management will maintain the same jurisdiction on appropriate bills. The appropriate bills will be sent there. Those are the highlights of some of the changes and I move adoption.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Representative Aresimowicz.

The question is on adoption of the resolution. Will you remark?

Representative Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

As indicated by the Majority Leader, most of these rules are as we had had them in the past, with the exception of those that were highlighted by the Majority Leader. And certainly all of those were discussed with both sides of the aisle and I would urge adoption of the resolution.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you for your comments.

Will you remark further? Will you remark further on the adoption of the resolution? If not, I will try your minds. All those in favor of the resolution, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Will the Clerk please call and read Senate Joint Resolution Number 2.

THE CLERK:

Senate Joint Resolution Number 2, RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE PUBLICATION OF THE LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN, PRINTING OF THE BILLS AND EXPENSES OF THE 2013 SESSION OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, introduced by Senator Looney and Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, we do have to pay our bills, so I move adoption.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

The question is on adoption. Will you remark? Will you remark further? If not, I will try your minds. All those in favor, please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Now if you remember right we assigned a couple of committees just a scant few minutes ago. And it's my understanding that they have done a tremendous job. I'd like to call upon the Committee to Canvass the Votes for State Representatives for their report. And the Chair would recognize Representative Gerry Fox.

REP. G. FOX (146th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker and congratulations to you as well.

The committee, having just been appointed, we did get a chance to quickly nod at each other and it does appear that the committee appointed to canvass the votes has met and is pleased to report that all of the vote tallies are in order so that there are no problems with the votes today.

So thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Well done for the quick work and the nod. I appreciate the report and the journal will so note.

At this time the Chair would recognize Representative Lou Esposito for the purposes of a report from the Committee on Seating.

REP. ESPOSITO (116th):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker. Nice to see you there. Congratulations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you.

REP. ESPOSITO (116th):

I would like to make a report from the Committee on Seating, Mr.  Speaker. We have met and examined the seating plan as requested. And we would like to report the seating plan is adequate and that all members and representatives are properly seated.

Thank you.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Representative. And thank you for your all-so quick work. You did that all in five minutes. It's amazing. I couldn't believe it. Thank you for that report. The Journal will so note.

Is there any business on the Clerk s desk.

THE CLERK:

Yes, Mr. Speaker. There's communications from the General Assembly leaders.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Refer to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the retiring Speaker of the House of Representatives to Executive and Legislative Nominations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

And I think we'll refer that to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the House Minority Leader, Executive and Legislative Nominations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Refer to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the Senate President Pro Tem, Executive and Legislative Nominations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

We would look to refer those once again to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the Senate majority -- or Minority Leader, Executive and Legislative Nominations.

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

Refer to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations.

THE CLERK:

And communications from the Governor of the State of Connecticut, list of interim appointments.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Once again, Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move we waive the reading of the list of interim appointments, that they be referred to the Committee on Executive and Legislative Nominations, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Is there objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, it's so ordered. And that this -- that this item is also ordered to be printed in the Journal.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the Governor, a list of judicial nominations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move we waive the reading of the list of nominations and that they be referred to the Judiciary Committee, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Is there objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, so ordered.

THE CLERK:

Communications from the Secretary of the State regarding Substitute House Joint Resolution Number 2 of the 2012 General Assembly; return for consideration in the 2013 regular session of the General Assembly pursuant to Article 6 of the amendments to the Constitution of the State of Connecticut.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

This item will be referred to the Committee on Government Administration and Elections.

THE CLERK:

List of communications and reports.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move we waive the reading of the list of communications and reports and that they be referred to the appropriate committees.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Is there objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, so ordered.

THE CLERK:

Introductions of bills, List Number 1, dated January 9, 2013.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move we waive the reading of the list of bills and that they be referred to the committees indicated, sir.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Is there objection, is there objection? Hearing none, so ordered. Is there any other business on the Clerk's desk.

THE CLERK:

Mr. Speaker, there is no further business.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz, I'm getting used to this. It's a great --

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

This is a great exchange.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

It's working well.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

This is almost fun.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

It's working good.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, I move for suspension of our rules and immediate consideration of House Resolution Number 6.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

The question before the Chamber is on suspension of the rules for the immediate consideration of House Resolution Number 6. Is there objection? Is there objection? Hearing none, the rules are suspended for that purpose.

Will the Clerk please call and read House Resolution Number 6.

THE CLERK:

House Resolution Number 6, RESOLUTION RAISING A COMMITTEE TO INFORM THE SENATE THAT THE HOUSE IS ORGANIZED AND READY TO MEET IN JOINT CONVENTION, introduced by Representative Aresimowicz.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr. Speaker, thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I move adoption of this resolution. It is self-explanatory and I believe the Senate is waiting.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

I was just going to suggest that, but thank you.

The question is on adoption. The committee won't have much work to do. Just come down to the well. Will you remark? Will you remark further? If not I will try your minds. All those in favor please signify it by saying aye.

REPRESENTATIVES:

Aye.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

All those opposed, nay.

The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

The Chair will now appoint a committee to inform the Senate. The Chair will appoint Representative Serra, Representative Fritz and Representative Candelora.

Are there any announcements or introductions?

Representative Ernie Hewett.

REP. HEWETT (39th):

Good morning, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Good morning, sir.

REP. HEWETT (39th):

Congratulations.

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

Thank you. And to you.

REP. HEWETT (39th):

Right time, right man, right place.

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

Thank you, sir, and to you.

REP. HEWETT (39th):

Ladies and gentlemen, in the well of the House is Vanessa J. Sebastian.

Hold on.

Vanessa J. Sebastian, the current reigning Mrs.  Connecticut 2012. Could you stand, please?

Mrs.  Sebastian, she recently competed at the Mrs.  America competition placing in the top ten and winning best costume. Vanessa is a (inaudible) Pequotic Native American. Her husband Brian Sebastian is a member of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe. Vanessa is a cancer survivor and volunteers for numerous charitable organizations.

Ladies and gentlemen, please rise and give a warm Connecticut General Assembly welcome to Mrs.  Connecticut 2012.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Congratulations and welcome to our Chamber on our opening day. We hope that you won't be a stranger and come back often. Thank you. Thank you.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Mr.  Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Yes, Representative Cafero.

REP. CAFERO (142nd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

And ladies and gentlemen of the Chamber, we often recognize each other for a length of service. There's a whole group of people that dutifully report of the goings-on here. We know them as the press.

And I want to take this opportunity to recognize the dean of the capital press corps who is beginning his 40th year in covering the capital, and that is Steve Kotchko. Congratulations to Steve.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, Representative Cafero.

And congratulations, Steve. We're going to have another couple of years together I'm sure and it will be a lot of fun, as it always has been.

Are there any other announcements or introductions?

Representative Widlitz.

REP. WIDLITZ (98th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker and congratulations to you. It's a joy to see you there.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you. Same to you, madam.

REP. WIDLITZ (98th):

Mr. Speaker, the Finance Revenue and Bonding Committee is very anxious to get back to work. So we are convening a meeting this afternoon at 2: 30. If the session goes a little longer we will convene immediately following this session. We will be meeting in Room 2E.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, and congratulations for your hard work, Madam Chairwoman.

Are there any other announcements or introductions? Any other announcements or introductions? If not -- oh, Representative Pat Billie Miller.

REP. P. B. MILLER (145th):

Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Speaker and congratulations.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, madam.

REP. P. B. MILLER (145th):

There will be appropriations organizational meeting this Friday, January the 11th at one o'clock in Room 2C. ]

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, madam. And thanks to the Appropriations Committee for their hard work as well.

Are there any other announcements or introductions? Are there any other announcements or introductions?

If not, the House will stand at ease.

(Chamber at ease. )

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Will the House please come back to order. Will the House please come back to order.

Will members take your seats. Our distinguished guests from upstairs, if you could do the same.

Will the House please come to order.

Representative Serra.

REP. SERRA (33rd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

It's a pleasure for me to address you as Mr.  Speaker for the first time for me.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, sir.

REP. SERRA (33rd):

Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to report that the committee to inform the Senate and the House is organized and has met and called upon the Lieutenant Governor and told the Senate that we are ready to meet in joint session -- joint convention. Sorry, sir.

SPEAKER SHARKEY:

Thank you, sir.

And from the looks in front of me in the well of the House it appears that you did an excellent job. With that, for all of us in attendance I would like to introduce a woman who needs no introduction, a friend of us all, the President of the Senate and our Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman.

Upon the invitation of the House, the Senate met the House in convention for the purpose of receiving the message of His Excellency, the Governor.

Her Honor, the Lieutenant-Governor, presided over the Joint Convention and the Clerk of the Senate and the Clerk of the House were Secretaries of the Convention.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you all very, very much. Wow. Thank you so very, very much. Thank you. Thank you, very, very much.

At this time I will call the joint convention to order. Members and guests please rise, direct your attention to Father Nock who will lead us in prayer.

SENATE CHAPLAIN REVEREND JAMES J. NOCK:

Let us pray.

Almighty Father, we ask Your blessing on this joint convention as we come together this afternoon to the Governor's address opening our session for 2013. These are very challenging times for the economy, the budget, school safety, education, transportation weighing heavily on our minds.

But let's never forget we are the land of the Charter Oak where courage and creativity of men and women working together saved a State and saved a nation. We did it then. We could do it now with Your grace and wisdom to guide us.

And we ask this of You who live and reign for ever and ever. Amen.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you, Father.

Speaker Sharkey -- that's the first time I've said that.

Speaker Sharkey, will you lead in the Pledge of Allegiance, please.

REP. SHARKEY (88th):

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you. Please be seated.

Let me just first start out by congratulating all of the leaders of both chambers. Speaker Sharkey, Majority Leader Aresimowicz, President Pro Tem Williams, Majority Leader Looney and of course Minority Leader Cafero and Minority Leader McKinney. Congratulations on being elected or reelected for your leadership position.

I first want to congratulate all of you also for being elected, or reelected as the case may be. To those of you returning, welcome back. To those of you about to join your first session you have joined a special body of government that can give you more opportunities and more experience and more fun than you've ever had before in your life.

My time in the House was absolutely some of the best years of my life, not only for all the things I learned, but for all the wonderful friends I made on both sides of the aisle. All I can say is that I wish you the same for all of you.

I just want to briefly address what I believe is an important -- as any issue that you will be dealing with this session. And that is my hope that we approach our work here every day with one thing in mind, that our first purpose here is not to represent Democrats or Republicans or interests of any one group that comes before us. Our purpose here is to represent the families of our great state and to do our best every day to make their lives better for now and in the future. And I just hope that no matter what we do here over the next six months we will never forget why we're really here.

I also think that if we are ever looking for inspiration to go through the inevitable ups and downs that the session brings we can look to how the families, the first responders and all those who responded to the unspeakable tragedy in Newtown. Instead of responding with anger or hatred, they responded with incredible dignity and with remarkable strength. And that should be the enduring lesson for all of us.

Nothing that we will do in the next six months will even approach the test of resolve that those people had to endure, and we will still endure for a long time what they have gone through. I ask that we look to their spirit of selflessness and bravery to guide us while we do the work of the people here at the capitol. It is our responsibility to face the difficult issues and to answer the difficult questions of their time -- on their behalf. They don't care which side is right. They just want us to get it right.

Together our administration and this General Assembly have made progress in the last two years and now it is time to commit to make sure that progress continues. By working together to find bipartisan solutions I'm confident that by working together again we will end this session having lived up to the commitment we made to the citizens of our State.

I thank you. God bless you and God bless this great State of Connecticut. We really need to work together.

So Mr.  Clerk, is there any business on your desk?

THE CLERK:

House joint resolution -- I'm sorry, Joint Convention Resolutions Number 3 and 4.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Senator Looney.

SENATOR LOONEY:

Thank you. Thank you very much, Madam President.

Madam President, would ask the Clerk to call Joint Convention Resolution Number 3 to begin our proceedings.

THE CLERK:

Joint Convention Number 3, Joint Convention Resolution Number 3, RESOLUTION INVITING THE GOVERNOR TO ATTEND THE JOINT CONVENTION, LCO Number 677, introduced by Senator Looney and Representative Aresimowicz.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

The question is on adoption.

Senator Looney.

SENATOR LOONEY:

Madam President. Yes, thank you, Madam President.

Madam President, I would move adoption of the resolution which is self-explanatory.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

The question is on adoption. I will try your minds. All those in favor please signify by saying aye.

CHAMBER:

Aye.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Opposed.

The ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

At this point I'm going to appoint the Majority Leaders and the Minority Leaders, Senator Martin Looney, Senator John McKinney, Representative Joe Aresimowicz and Representative Larry Cafero, to invite the Governor to attend the joint session.

For those that are new, it's just down the hall.

You know, while they are carrying out their duties I would like to take an opportunity to do some dignitaries that are here today.

First Chief Justice Chase Rogers has joined us.

Justice Flemming Norcott, Jr. has joined us.

Justice Richard Palmer.

Justice Peter Zarrella.

And Justice Dennis Eveleigh has joined us.

On the other side we have our Secretary of State Denise Merrill, former member of the House.

We have our Treasurer Denise Nappier.

Our Comptroller Kevin Lembo.

And last, but of course not least our Attorney General George Jepsen.

We also today have been privileged to have our U. S. Senator Dick Blumenthal here with us today.

Let me just add one thing. I would ask that all the local elected leaders -- the last time I made a real mistake by trying to pick them out -- all the local elected mayors and first selectmen, please stand up so we can recognize you and thank you.

Thank you all very much.

And since they haven't come back yet -- I told you it wasn't that long, while you're down.

I would ask if there are any points of personal privilege from anyone?

Yes, Representative Sawyer.

REP. SAWYER (55th):

And in the back, Madam Governor, we also have a former congressman, Congressman Rob Simmons. I'd like to welcome him back to the Chamber.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you. Welcome back, Rob. It's good to see you again.

At this time I think we're going to have somebody walking into the room. I think the committee -- here we come. I think the committee has fulfilled their duties; and hereby discharged.

And we will welcome in our Governor.

Thank you. You know, it's hard to believe that two years have passed since the Governor and I took office and that this is the third time I have had the honor of introducing him to this joint assembly.

These two years have certainly brought their share of hardships to our State, natural, economic and otherwise, but there is no question that despite the many headwinds we have faced this Governor has ended years of complacency in our state government and is moving Connecticut forward again.

Our State is reinventing -- reinvigorated itself on so many levels, whether it's our approach to spurring economic growth, educating our children or caring for the sick and the elderly. I look forward to working with him and with all of you again this session to get -- keep the momentum going for the benefit of everyone who calls our state home.

Our state just went through, and is still going through a tragedy that we never expected. I personally have privately thanked the Governor for his work. Those of you that were not in attendance, those of you that had not been on the ground in Newtown don't understand the feeling of what happened or how the Governor led. There are a lot of people that we have to thank, and I know the Governor is going to do that. And they all know from the bottom of my heart I thank them, but I've got to personally thank the Governor for taking hold of the reigns of a very, very difficult situation and helping with compassion and leadership and caring to getting people's lives hopefully back online again.

So ladies and gentlemen, I can't tell you how proud I am to introduce a man who has the compassion, who understands what vision is, who has no greater love but for this state and for the people in it, our Governor Dannel P. Malloy.

GOVERNOR DANNEL MALLOY:

Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you very much. We have work to do. Thank you. Thank you. Please. Thank you. Thank you.

Mr.  President, Mr.  Speaker, Senator McKinney, Representative Cafero, my good friend Lieutenant Governor Wyman and my fellow state officials, ladies and gentlemen of the General Assembly, honored members of the judiciary, members of the clergy and to all of the citizens of the great State of Connecticut who are watching or listening today, thank you. Thank you for the honor of inviting me into the people's House to address you.

I'd also like to offer my sincere congratulations to the leadership of the Democrat and Republican caucuses in each chamber, and especially to Speaker Sharkey and Majority Leader Aresimowicz as they take on their new roles. Congratulations as well to all the members of the General Assembly who were sworn in earlier today. I want to say that I look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead.

As we gather in this historic chamber let us always keep in our thoughts the brave men and women of the great State of Connecticut serving in our armed forces around the globe. We thank them and our veterans for their service and sacrifice and we pray for their continued safety and health.

I'd like to recognize my wife Kathy and two of my sons, Dannel and Sam who join us today. Thank you.

As I know is true for so many of you, I could not possibly do my job without the tremendous love and support of my family.

Finally, we are joined by two of Newtown's finest leaders, First Selectwoman Pat Llodra and School Superintendent Janet Robinson. It's an honor to have you with us today.

You were tested by unimaginable tragedy. Your compassionate and your leadership over the past month has been an inspiration to Connecticut and to me personally. It will not surprise anyone here tonight or today that this speech is very different from the one that I first envisioned giving. In the early days of December I began thinking about what I'd like to say today. Now while it's only been a few short weeks on the calendar we have all walked a very long and very dark road together.

What befell Newtown is not something that we thought possible in any Connecticut beautiful small town or our cities, and yet in the midst of one of the worst days in our history we also saw the best of our state, teachers and a therapist that sacrificed their lives protecting students.

A principal and school psychologist that ran into harm's way. Our brave Connecticut state troopers, Newtown's law enforcement and firemen and others that responded courageously when called upon.

I'm sorry.

In the aftermath a selectwoman, a superintendent and other local officials have served around the clock bringing comfort and stability to Newtown. And today Sandy Hook's teachers are doing what they do best, putting the interests of their students first as they return to classrooms and providing stability and continuity that has never been so important and so needed as it is today.

And then of course, there are the 26 families, the families that despite unimaginable loss have gotten up each and every day since that happened and have been there for one another and have supported their communities as much as those communities have supported them. They have persevered and in that perseverance we should all find strength.

We have lifted one another up and continued carrying on the spirit of our fallen heroes and our wounded families in our beautiful lost children. As a State and as a community we will continue to do whatever we can for the families of Newtown, but we must also ask ourselves, what is our responsibility? To those we've lost, to one another, to the children and a future generations.

During this legislative session we're going to begin to answer those questions together. Let us do everything in our power to ensure that Connecticut never again suffers a loss such as this, that we take real steps to make our kids and our communities safer.

Last week my administration announced the formation of the Sandy Hook Advisory Commission comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement and first response. Now we may never know what motivated the events at Sandy Hook Elementary, but that will not stop us from working to prevent future tragedies.

Over the coming months the commission will come together to make specific actionable recommendations in areas of school safety, mental health services and gun violence protection. This session I know there will be others that will take action on these issues, and I applaud those efforts as well. The more resources we can bring to bear on this issue the better. Working together we can and will affect real change.

There are some things we already know. We know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. As a society we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. We must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety.

And when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools let me say this, more guns are not the answer.

Let me be very, very clear. Let me be clear, freedom is not a handgun on the hip of every teacher and security should not mean a guard posted outside every classroom.

That is not who we are in Connecticut and it is not who we will allow ourselves to become. We also know that this conversation must take place nationally, because as long as weapons continue to travel up and down I-951 what is available for sale in Florida can have devastating consequences here in Connecticut. There will be more to say in the weeks ahead, but let me be clear, today our focus will be first and foremost on protecting Connecticut families.

Now those conversations won't always be easy, but as your Governor I've learned there is no challenge we face that we can't overcome with the power of our community. Together we have come time and time again; we've done it with purpose because we know there is something bigger in this world and more important than who we are as individuals, it is our community.

My friends, as we begin this legislative session let us be guided by the devotion to the common good, by faith in each other and by a determination to work together to make community as strong as it can possibly be in every way.

Now looking back over these past 24 months we have faced many challenges, the largest per capita budget deficit in the nation, a struggling economy, a fractured public school system, untenable energy costs and natural disasters the likes of which our generation had never seen. And then in December just when we thought the worst had happened, it actually did.

The people of Connecticut, the communities you represent and all of us in this chamber, when tested we met those challenges head on. We did as our forefathers did, as our grandparents and parents taught us to do, we dug in and we banded together. We decided to focus, not on what makes us different, but on what makes us the same, our common humanity. It is this core strength and that spirit of community that brought us together to accomplish so much on behalf of the people of Connecticut.

Two years ago we faced the single largest per-capita deficit in the nation. It was a problem decades in the making. We knew that getting our fiscal house in order was critical to creating jobs. Connecticut employers needed a responsible and predictable partner in state government. We came together and passed a balanced budget. We cut more than we added in revenues, and even after revenues came in short, as they did in 31 states, we know today that our budget as enacted fixed more than 90 percent of the problem.

And last month Democrats and Republicans came together to make sure we closed that final gap without raising taxes. Now anyone who tells you that the budget we passed two years ago didn't do its job, that it didn't make real change in how we approach our finances is simply not telling the truth. I know that many of you cast very hard votes to fix those problems and that's the kind of resolve and leadership that we're going to -- that we are, in fact, bringing back to Connecticut.

We've made other tough decisions along the way. After years of underfunding our pensions a $ 4. 5 billion payment would have been required in the year 2032, more than four times what we currently pay. That payment would have been impossible. That's why last year we restructured our payments to reverse years of chronic underfunding. We're avoiding our own fiscal cliff and saving Connecticut's citizens $ 6 billion over the next 20 years. We didn't kick the can down the road, we picked it up.

Then through a restructured benefits and pension agreement with our public employees, we're saving the State approximately $ 20 billion. And we made sure that state government tightened its own belt as well. We shrank the number of state agencies by more than 25 percent. We trimmed executive branch employees by more than 1200 positions over the past two years, including more than a 10 percent reduction in the number of state managers.

As we've done more with less, so have our hard-working state employees. They've adapted and found new ways to continue providing critical services to state residents. We have all had to buckle down and make tough choices and we're going to have to make more of them in the weeks and months to come.

Now recently there has been a national conversation about economic development, about whether it makes any sense to have states competing against one another for jobs. It is a good conversation to have and it's the right time to have it, but a dialogue on the best way forward cannot be an excuse for standing still; we see too much of that in Washington.

I believe, I firmly believe that we, each one of us in this chamber must approach this session with a core guiding principle. Until every person in our state who wants a job can find one we have more work to do.

We cannot stick our heads in the sand or simply hope for the best, not when other states are actively recruiting jobs from every corner of the globe, jobs that can and should come to Connecticut. We must compete for every single job.

With that mindset we've begun to tackle the challenges of economic development in a holistic way in our State. Our First Five Program along with the addition of Jackson laboratories has leveraged a $ 180 million commitment in public funding to drive more than $ 2 billion -- $ 2 billion in private investment.

That same program made it possible for Connecticut to bring two Fortune 500 companies to our state. Now the last time that we talked about two Fortune 500 companies was in 2006 and that was because they were leaving. On Main Streets across Connecticut the Small Business Express Program is giving local employers the chance to expand and create jobs. It was because of this program that Bevin Brothers Manufacturing in East Hampton was able to rebuild after a fire ravaged their historic bell factory. They purchased new equipment and got their employees back to work because of that program.

Just a few months ago I announced the third plank of our economic development strategy, an innovation ecosystem. The program has one goal and that is connecting people with good and great ideas with capital investors. It will create new high-skilled jobs, jobs with good wages and jobs with good benefits in our state of Connecticut. Now we're off to a good start, but it is only a start. The key is making government an active partner rather than a bystander who watches markets develop elsewhere.

By investing in growth industries like bioscience and digital media, by recruiting companies like Jackson Laboratories and NBC Sports and by standing with our small businesses and our startups we are taking steps to make Connecticut -- make sure that Connecticut leads again.

When it came to education the stakes were clear; take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. I am proud that after a long and hard debate we were able to say with one voice that the status quo was no longer acceptable, that when it comes to public education we can't keep doing what we've always done and simply hope for better results, that our kids can't afford it and our State cannot afford it as well.

We worked with an eye towards the future and made an historic investment of nearly $ 100 million from pre-K to high school focusing on districts that we know are most in need.

Now reaching kids early is critical to that success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. So we created 1,000 new school readiness openings statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that that was possible. That's 1,000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall day one ready to learn. We did it together and we will do more.

To combat an unacceptable achievement gap we've begun transforming underperforming schools through the newly created commissioners network. Four schools have already volunteered and are benefiting from intensive intervention, increased instruction time and improved collaboration among teachers and administrators. Now I have visited these four schools in Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven and Norwich and each exhibits a new energy and renewed sense of purpose, and more schools are lining up to be transformed in the years ahead.

Of course, reform could not be complete without supporting our teachers. They have dedicated their lives to our children and for the first time in a very long time we're dedicating new resources for them as well. We know success is possible. We have seen it. With a cooperative effort where every voice is heard, we're going to replicate it in classrooms around our state. The bottom line is that students are going to be better prepared for school today and for the job market tomorrow.

When it came to energy our State had been a national leader for years in the worst possible way. We had the highest electric rates in the continental United States, rates that were squeezing the budgets of families and businesses. We came together. We decided we needed a plan to take these problems head on. We realized that our economic energy -- our environmental, energy and economic needs were all related and that the path we chose would impact our economy in this State for years to come.

We consolidated state agencies to better coordinate our energy functions. We strengthened programs promoting renewable power and energy efficiency. We're leveraging private capital to deliver energy at a price lower than almost anywhere else in the United States. Today we've seen electric rates drop in Connecticut by 12 percent across the board, but we cannot stop now.

The comprehensive energy strategy that my administration announced this past October shows us the way forward. Together we will expand cheaper, cleaner and more reliable energy choices for consumers, enhancing efficiency programs for all communities at the same time helping to create thousands of new jobs.

Putting Connecticut businesses and consumers in control of their energy future will have a real and immediate impact. You need look no further than Modern Woodcrafts, a locally owned company in Plainville. They invested in the kind of energy incentives that our state plan will promote. They are seeing more than a $ 35,000 savings per year in energy costs.

Or you could look at Woodbridge where Amity High School will have an annual budget savings of $ 120,000, more than the salary of two teachers after the town made a conversion to natural gas. Across Connecticut we are taking control of our energy future for the first time.

High energy prices, struggling schools, a broken budget, a sluggish economy, all problems that every person in this room knew that we were facing two years ago and we have faced them together.

One challenge we didn't see coming, in 2011 Connecticut was rocked by the worst winter in our history; two storms packing a one-two punch, the likes of which we haven't seen in our state in more than 25 years. Tropical Storm Irene and the October nor'easter revealed holes in our emergency response system that should have been addressed years, if not decades ago. It was a wake-up call and we woke up. We've put in place new procedures to better coordinate emergency response infrastructure. We commissioned a two-storm panel to investigate exactly what went wrong and to determine what needed to be done to prevent unacceptable power and communication disruptions.

The panel led directly -- directly to the passage of tough new laws, laws that hold Connecticut utility companies accountable for how they respond to emergencies. And we created a new energy micro-grid program to increase energy reliability in critical areas.

Now these weren't quick fixes or window dressing. They were the result of saying that we had had enough and it was time for us to do more. What does it all mean for Connecticut residents? We know that we will again feel the brunt of bad weather, but we can tell our citizens that the State is more prepared for future challenges, that their families will be safer when a disaster strikes and that the odds of anyone -- anyone having to needlessly suffer through prolonged power outages have been greatly diminished.

When Hurricane Sandy struck we saw the results of the work we had done together. While we can never entirely prevent damage or power outages, the response was in fact better and faster. Once again we saw a problem and together we worked to address it.

If these past two years have proven anything it's that we have the ability to rally around a common good and a common goal. We've done it in a way that that just doesn't seem possible these days in some places and certainly not in Washington D. C.

In December at the same time that leadership from each of your caucuses was meeting with my team for long hours night after night to develop a mitigation plan, our national budget was being driven to and then off a fiscal cliff. While we've worked to manage our State's finances national inaction hangs like a dark cloud over our state budget. For the many Connecticut families with someone working in our defense industry, Washington's inability to address problems on a reasonable deadline is causing sleepless nights and it is unnecessary.

And earlier this month, while many families and small businesses were still working to recover from Hurricane Sandy, that gears once again ground to a halt, slowing the process of getting aid to those who needed it most, and that is unacceptable.

Now I say this, not to demean any of our colleagues in Washington, but in the hope that we will better appreciate what we have accomplished here in Connecticut. Two years ago you first welcomed me into this Chamber. I spoke then about the challenges we faced and about the opportunities that we knew were within our grasp. I spoke about who we are as a community, about the ingenuity, the resolve and the resilience that has defined Connecticut for centuries, about Eli Whitney and Prudence Crandall and Harriet Beecher Stowe, about a history of overcoming challenges together.

My friends, that is still who we are today. We have come a long way in two years and we've done it together as a government, as a community, as a State. So in 2013 let us honor one another, let us honor our renewed community and let us honor those we've lost.

We have a great deal of work to do, but if history is any judge we will rise to the occasion. When called upon we will answer as we have done time and time again as one people, one community and one Connecticut.

So as we begin our work which will take many months to complete may God bless each and every one of you. May God bless the great State of Connecticut and may God bless the United States of America.

Thank you.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you, Governor.

Senator Looney.

SENATOR LOONEY:

Yes, thank you. Thank you, Madam President.

I believe the Clerk is in possession of Joint Convention Resolution Number 4.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Mr.  Clerk.

THE CLERK:

Joint convention Resolution Number 4, RESOLUTION CONCERNING PRINTING OF THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE, LCO Number 678, introduced by Senator Looney and Representative Aresimowicz.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Senator Looney.

SENATOR LOONEY:

Yes, thank you. Thank you, Madam President.

Madam President, before moving for adoption of that resolution, would like to congratulate the new Majority Leader of the House Representative Aresimowicz, and to thank him for the use of his desk and microphone today.

Also like to congratulate Speaker Sharkey and announce that I expect there will soon be a ticker tape parade in the town of Hamden in his honor, as there should be.

And also to congratulate, if I might, the new Clerk of the House Martin Dunleavy of New Haven who's been my friend for more than 30 years since before I was first elected to the House and before he served as an aide to then Speaker Stolberg.

And I would ask some indulgence for the New York Yankee fans among the House membership to cut Marty some slack because he is in the 99th percentile of rabid Red Sox, fans so you'll have to take that into account.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

 Boo.

SENATOR LOONEY:

And at that, Madam President, thank you.

I would move adoption of the resolution to memorialize the Governor's message through the printing of that message.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

I never knew Marty was that old.

The question is on adoption. I will try your minds. All those in favor please signify by saying aye.

CHAMBER:

Aye.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

The ayes have it.

Members and guests, please rise. Direct your attention to the House Chaplain. She will come and give us the benediction.

ASSISTANT CHAPLAIN REVEREND GARLAND D. HIGGINS:

Let us pray.

And now to the One who is able to do everything unimaginable to us. Let the peace of God rule in our hearts to which we were called in one body. And whatever we do in word or deed let us to all in the name of the Lord, giving thanks to God.

Amen.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Thank you.

Senator Looney.

SENATOR LOONEY:

Thank you, Madam President.

Madam President, having concluded our business and having heard the Governor's inspiring message, would move that the joint convention stand adjourned.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

All those in favor please signify by saying aye.

CHAMBER:

Aye.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR NANCY WYMAN:

Opposed.

The joint convention is dissolved.

Upon motion of Senator Looney of the 11th, it was voted that the Convention be dissolved. The President thereupon dissolved the Convention and the Senate withdrew.

Deputy Speaker Godfrey in the Chair.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

The House of Representatives will return to order.

Are there any announcements? Any committee announcements? If not, Representative Aresimowicz -- I'm sorry.

Representative Tercyak is seeking the floor. I'll have order.

Representative Tercyak.

REP. TERCYAK (26th):

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. It's good to see you up there, again.

The Labor and Public Employees Committee will be meeting tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock in the labor conference room. Thank you very much.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Thank you, sir. Are there any other announcements? Any other committee announcements?

Representative Fox, of the Judiciary Committee Chair.

REP. G. FOX (146th):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

For purposes of an announcement. The Judiciary Committee will have its organizational meeting on Monday the 14th to be followed by a public hearing where we have a number of judicial nominees as well as we will follow that with a committee vote. So if the members could be prepared for that.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Do you have a time and place?

REP. G. FOX (146th):

I would anticipate 10 a. m.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

And room to be announced?

REP. G. FOX (146th):

It will be -- I think it's going to be 10 a. m. I'm confirming the room, but that's what I'm looking at.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Thank you, sir.

REP. G. FOX (146th):

Thank you.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Are there any other -- quiet, please. House of Representatives is in session.

Are there any other announcements?

Representative Urban.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

For the purposes of an introduction and an announcement.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Proceed, madam.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

Mr. Speaker, I'd like to introduce Chris Anino who is here listening to the Governor's speech. And he is wildly enthusiastic about government and he is homeschooled and here with his mom. So I'd just like to welcome him to the people's House.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Welcome. I hope you enjoy your day here. It's an exciting time.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

And for the purposes of an announcement, the Children's Committee will have it's organizational meeting tomorrow at 11 a. m. in Room 2A.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

2A.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

And as we are gathering right here, any legislators for animal advocacy, we're briefly meeting right now right here.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Very good.

REP. URBAN (43rd):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Thank you, ma'am.

Are there any other announcements? Are there any other committee announcements?

Hearing none, the distinguished Majority Leader Representative Aresimowicz.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Speaker Godfrey, thank you very much -- that kind of sounded nice. Thank you.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Thank you, sir.

REP. ARESIMOWICZ (30th):

Mr.  Speaker, I move that we adjourn subject to the call of the Chair.

DEPUTY SPEAKER GODFREY:

Question is on adjournment subject to the call of the Chair. Is there objection?

Hearing none, the House stands adjourned subject to the call of the Chair.

On motion of Representative Aresimowicz of the 30th District, the House adjourned at 1: 30 o'clock p. m. , to meet again at the Call of the Chair.

CERTIFICATE

I hereby certify that the foregoing 144 pages is a complete and accurate transcription of a digital sound recording of the House Proceedings on Wednesday, January 9, 2013.

I further certify that the digital sound recording was transcribed by the word processing department employees of United Reporters, Inc. , under my direction.

_____________________________

Guy B. Raboin, President

Notary Public

UNITED REPORTERS, INC.

90 Brainard Road, Suite 103

Hartford, Connecticut 06114

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