Location:
EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


April 15, 2013

 

2013-R-0214

QUESTIONS FOR NOMINEE TO CRRA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

By: Kristen L. Miller, Legislative Analyst II

CONNECTICUT RESOURCES RECOVERY AUTHORITY (CRRA) (CGS 22A-261 AND 262)

● The authority's board of directors consists of 11 members appointed by the governor and legislative leaders. The governor appoints three members, and the Senate president pro tempore, the House speaker, the Senate minority leader, and House minority leader each appoint two members.

● Three directors must represent towns with a population of fewer than 50,000 and two must represent towns with populations greater than 50,000.

● Five directors represent the public and must have extensive, high-level experience in a specified field. Three must be experienced in finance, business, or industry; one in an environmental field; and one in an energy field.

● Directors serve four-year terms and must be confirmed by both houses. The governor designates one member to serve as chairman, with the advice and consent of both houses. The chairman serves at the governor's pleasure.

● CRRA is a quasi-public agency that plans, designs, builds, and operates solid waste disposal, volume reduction, recycling, intermediate processing, and resources recovery facilities. The chairman, with approval of the board of directors, appoints the president of the authority, who supervises the authority's administrative affairs and technical activities.

CURRENT ISSUES

1. In prior legislative sessions, bills were introduced to change the composition of CRRA's board of directors.

a. Are you satisfied with the board's current composition?

b. What changes do you believe would be most beneficial to the board's membership, if any?

2. A 2012 study commissioned by CRRA found that recycling – a $746 million industry employing about 4,800 people - is a growing sector of Connecticut's economy. How do you see the state of the recycling industry and its impact on the economy? Do you believe the demand for recycled products will grow?

3. You were appointed to represent municipalities with less than 50,000 people. Is there a significant difference in the waste management needs of large and small towns? How will your perspective influence your decisions on the board?

4. What do you believe will be the most pressing issues for CRRA's board this year?

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING

1. The contracting municipalities that recycle through CRRA's Mid-Connecticut Project increased their recycling rate in each of the last six years. To what do you attribute this continued rise?

2. Earlier this year, CRRA announced that it was accepting large rigid plastic items (e.g., large toys, beverage crates, laundry baskets) and books in their recycling bins.

a. Aside from CRRA's press release, how has CRRA made the public aware of this change?

b. Are there additional products that CRRA is considering to add to its list of recyclable items?

3. In recent years, the legislature passed “producer responsibility” laws concerning electronics and architectural paint to hold producers accountable for the cost of disposing of or recycling their products. There is also a bill before the legislature this session to create a similar program for mattresses. What is your opinion on these types of programs?

4. About 25% to 30% of municipal solid waste is food and lawn waste. What has CRRA done to encourage composting? How can municipalities encourage their residents to reduce food and lawn waste?

5. Do you believe that unit-based pricing systems for solid waste disposal (also called “Pay-As-You-Throw”) increase recycling and reduce solid waste disposal? What are the arguments for and against this type of pricing system?

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