Location:
EDUCATION - HEAD START; FAMILIES; SCHOOLS;
Scope:
Connecticut laws/regulations; Background;

OLR Research Report


October 24, 2012

 

2012-R-0457

NEW SCHOOL READINESS SLOTS, FAMILY RESOURCE CENTERS AND SCHOOL HEALTH CLINICS UNDER THE EDUCATION REFORM ACT OF 2012

By: John Moran, Principal Analyst

You asked which school districts are eligible for the new school readiness slots, family resource centers, and school-based health clinics required by the 2012 Education Reform Act (PA 12-116).

The 2012 act requires the education commissioner to provide funding in FY 13 for 1,000 new school readiness slots and at least 10 new family resource centers (FRCs). It also requires the public health commissioner to fund at least 20 new or expanded school-based health clinics (SBHCs) for FY 13. The act specifies that these services must be located in educational reform, priority and former priority, certain competitive, and alliance districts. 

 

SCHOOL READINESS SLOTS 

 

The Education Reform Act (PA 12-116, 1) requires the education commissioner to provide funding for 1,000 new slots in school readiness programs in FY 13. The slots must be allocated as follows:

1. 500 in the educational reform districts,

2. 250 in priority or former priority districts that are not educational reform districts, and

3. 250 in school readiness program competitive districts.

The governor announced the distribution of the school readiness slots on July 10, 2012.

Educational Reform Districts 

The educational reform districts are the 10 school districts with the lowest performance on statewide mastery tests, according to a district performance index the act establishes. Table 1 lists these districts and the new slots allocated to each.

Table 1: Educational Reform Districts

District

New Slots

Bridgeport

130

East Hartford

30

Hartford

64

Meriden

58

New Britain

41

New Haven

53

New London

31

Norwich

26

Waterbury

51

Windham

16

TOTAL

500

Priority and Former Priority Districts 

Priority districts are designated using a statutory formula that includes population, concentration of school-aged children receiving Temporary Family Assistance, and academic performance on by state mastery test scores (CGS 10-266p). PA 12-116 allocates 250 new slots to priority and former priority school districts that are not educational reform districts. Table 2 shows the nine districts that fall into this category and their new slot allocations.

Table 2: Priority and Former Priority Districts

District

New Slots

Ansonia

21

Bloomfield

4

Bristol

48

Danbury

58

Middletown

8

Norwalk

50

Putnam

30

Stamford

6

West Haven

25

TOTAL

250

Competitive Districts

The competitive districts are those that do not fall into either of the two foregoing categories but that either (1) are among the 50 poorest districts in the state or (2) have at least one school where 40% or more of the school lunches served are to students eligible for free or reduced price lunches (“priority school”) (CGS 10-16p(d)).

Of the districts in this category, 19 received new slots from the 250 allocated to such districts in the act. These districts and their slot allocations are listed in Table 3.

Table 3: Competitive Districts Receiving New Slots

District

New Slots

District

New Slots

East Haven

14

Naugatuck

15

Enfield

12

Plainfield

3

Greenwich

13

Stratford

13

Griswold

13

Torrington

15

Groton

20

Vernon

15

Hamden

10

West Hartford

10

Hebron

18

Winchester

15

Killingly

15

Windsor

6

Ledyard

18

Windsor Locks

24

Manchester

1

TOTAL

250

Table 4 lists the competitive districts that did not receive a new slot allocation.

 

Table 4: Competitive Districts Not Receiving New Slots

Andover

Ellington

Seymour

Ashford

Hampton

Shelton

Beacon Falls

Lebanon

Sprague

Brooklyn

Lisbon

Stafford

Canterbury

Mansfield

Sterling

Chaplin

Milford

Thomaston

Colchester

North Canaan

Thompson

Coventry

Plainville

Voluntown

Derby

Plymouth

Wolcott

Eastford

Scotland

 

FAMILY RESOURCE CENTERS AND SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH CLINICS

 

The Education Reform act (PA 12-116, 8) requires the education commissioner to establish at least 10 new FRCs and the public health commissioner to establish at least 20 new or expanded SBHCs in FY 13 in “alliance districts.” The alliance districts are the 30 school districts with the lowest performance on statewide mastery tests as determined under what is called the District Performance Index.

Table 5 lists the schools and alliance districts that the State Department of Education selected for new school-based FRCs. FRCs provide wraparound services for students and their families including: home visitations to screen for child development needs, before- and after-school care, summer camps, child-rearing skills classes, high school equivalency classes, English as a second language programs, and other services. The selections were announced on August 22, 2012.

 

Table 5: Alliance Districts and Schools Receiving New Family Resource Centers

Green-Hills School, Bristol

Franklin Mayberry Elementary School, East Hartford

Ridge Hill School, Hamden

J.C. Clark School, Hartford

Roger Sherman Elementary School, Meriden

Smith Elementary School, New Britain

Fair Haven Elementary School, New Haven

Ross Woodward Classical Studies School, New Haven

John B. Stanton Elementary School, Norwich

Jonathan Reed Elementary School, Waterbury

The alliance districts that are not receiving new FRC are listed in Table 6.

Table 6: Alliance Districts Not Receiving Family Resource Centers – FY 13

Ansonia

Killingly

Stamford

Bloomfield

Manchester

Vernon

Bridgeport

Middletown

West Haven

Danbury

Naugatuck

Winchester

Derby

New London

Windham

East Haven

Norwalk

Windsor

East Windsor

Putnam

Windsor Locks

As of the date of this report the locations of the new SBHCs have not yet been announced.

JM:ro