Education Committee

JOINT FAVORABLE REPORT

Bill No.:

SB-299

Title:

AN ACT CONCERNING MINOR REVISIONS TO THE EDUCATION STATUTES.

Vote Date:

3/23/2012

Vote Action:

Joint Favorable Substitute

PH Date:

3/5/2012

File No.:

2719

SPONSORS OF BILL:

Education Committee

REASONS FOR BILL:

To make minor revisions to the education statutes relating to Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program instructors and school building projects for incorporated or endowed high schools or academies.

RESPONSE FROM ADMINISTRATION/AGENCY:

NONE PRESENTED

NATURE AND SOURCES OF SUPPORT:

Bryan D. Holmes, Lt Col, USAF, Danbury High School Junior ROTC spoke out in favor of S.B. 299 and recommended some additional changes to the education statutes. His first recommendation was to replace the word “permit” with “certificate because “teachers must hold a certificate to teach, not a permit, and all teaching regulations refer to teachers as 'certified.'” Second, he recommended replacing the word “Board” in State Board of Education with “Department” because in Connecticut, there is no State “Board of Education,” but rather, it is referred to as the State “Department” of Education. Lastly, he recommended adding additional language to the end of the section that would read “additionally, the State Department of Education will count all previous JROTC instructors teaching time as full-time certified teaching time.”

Senator Michael A. McLachlan, Assistant Minority Leader testified in support of S.B. 299 because “it will ensure that JROTC programs are striving in Connecticut.”

NATURE AND SOURCES OF OPPOSITION:

Dr. Linette Branham, Connecticut Education Association spoke in opposition to S.B. 299 because she argued that it “works against both the Commissioner's short-term solution and what JROTC instructors need” She asked that the language in the bill requiring JROTC instructors to be issued a “permit” be changed to a “certificate.” This is because, “a 'teaching permit' is a document that has a short-term validity period and allows a person to teach while working to meet the requirements for a certificate, but doesn't allow that person to be part of the teacher's retirement system while a 'certificate' is a document that is issued to a person who has met all of the requirements set by the State Board of Education to teach a particular subject.” Ms. Branham argued that JROTC teachers deserve the opportunity to become part of the teacher's retirement system because they make “valuable contributions to the education of our students through course content, leadership skill development, and community service.”

Reported by: David A. Giglio

Date: March 26, 2012