PA 11-57—SB 1242

Emergency Certification

AN ACT AUTHORIZING BONDS OF THE STATE FOR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS AUTHORIZING SPECIAL TAX OBLIGATION BONDS OF THE STATE FOR TRANSPORTATION PURPOSES AND AUTHORIZING STATE GRANT COMMITMENTS FOR SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECTS

SUMMARY: This act authorizes up to $9 million in state general obligation (GO) bonds for FY 11, up to $1. 202 billion for FY 12, and up to $1. 365 billion for FY 13 for state capital projects and grant programs, including school construction, water quality, and economic development projects; farmland and open space acquisition and preservation; and improvements to state buildings, property, and parks.

It establishes a new $20 million bond-funded program to help municipalities jointly buy or lease needed vehicles and capital equipment; authorizes $172. 5 million for the development of a University of Connecticut technology park; and merges three existing programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in state buildings.

It authorizes up to $578. 6 million in special tax obligation (STO) bonds for FY 12 and up to $515. 2 million in FY 13 for transportation projects and up to $471. 78 million in revenue bonds over the two years for Clean Water Fund loans.

It approves $284. 9 million in grant commitments for 22 new local school construction, vocational agriculture (vo-ag), and interdistrict magnet school projects and reauthorizes five previously authorized projects with significant changes in cost and scope, for a net increase of $1. 85 million in grant authorizations for those projects. Finally, the act approves various exemptions, waivers, and changes in previously authorized school construction projects.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Various, see below.

1-38 — BOND AUTHORIZATIONS FOR STATE AGENCY PROJECTS AND GRANTS

This act authorizes GO bonding for FY 12 and FY 13 for state facilities, infrastructure, and programs; development and rehabilitation for housing projects and supportive housing; and grants to nonprofit organizations, municipalities, and other eligible entities. The bonds are subject to standard issuance procedures and have a maximum term of 20 years. The act includes a standard provision requiring private entities receiving bond-funded grants for facilities to repay a portion of the grant if a facility ceases to be used for the grant's purpose within 10 years of the entity receiving it.

Table 1 lists the purpose and amounts of these GO bond authorizations for FY 12 and FY 13.

Table 1: GO Bond Authorizations for FY 12 and FY 13

AGENCY

FOR

FY 12

FY 13

State Projects

2 (a), 21 (a)

Secretary of the State

Development, implementation, and upgrade of information technology systems

$3,000,000

$2,000,000

2 (b), 21 (b)

Comptroller

CORE financial system: Enhancements and upgrades

15,000,000

7,000,000

2 (c), 21 (c)

Office of Policy and Management

Criminal Justice Information System: Design and implementation

7,700,000

4,720,000

State and local benchmarking systems: Design and implementation, including technology development

4,000,000

2,000,000

2 (d)

Veterans' Affairs

Power plant upgrades, Rocky Hill

1,750,000

0

Boiler repairs and improvements, Rocky Hill

250,000

0

2 (e), 21 (d)

Administrative Services

Development of a new data center, including design, construction, and demolition, provided before the money is allocated, DAS must study other methods of storing and using data

21,000,000

0

State Office Building, Hartford: Exterior renovations and improvements, including installation of air conditioning

1,500,000

21,500,000

State-owned buildings and grounds: Infrastructure repairs and improvements

12,500,000

12,500,000

2 (f), 21 (e)

Construction Services

Removal and encapsulation of asbestos in state-owned buildings

5,000,000

5,000,000

State-owned buildings and grounds: Infrastructure repairs and improvements

2,500,000

2,500,000

Land acquisition, construction, improvements, repairs, and renovations at fire training schools, notwithstanding a statutory provision limiting the department's authority to state-owned or -leased buildings. (Nine of the fire training schools are controlled by municipal or regional fire associations and are not state-owned. )

0

2,000,000

2 (g), 21 (f)

Public Safety

Buildings and grounds: Alterations and improvements, including utilities, mechanical systems, and energy conservation projects

5,000,000

2,212,000

Programmatic study of state police troops and districts and development of a design prototype for troop facilities

1,000,000

0

2 (h), 21 (g)

Military

State matching funds for anticipated federal reimbursable projects

2,000,000

2,000,000

Buildings and grounds: alterations and improvements, including utilities, mechanical systems, and energy conservation projects

1,000,000

1,000,000

Construction of a readiness center for the Connecticut Army National Guard Civil Support Team in Windsor Locks

1,250,000

0

Construction of a combined support maintenance shop for Connecticut National Guard equipment in Windsor Locks

4,000,000

0

National Guard Armory, New London & Stones Ranch storage facility, East Lyme: Alterations, renovations, and improvements for the 250th Engineering Company

0

2,000,000

2 (i),

21 (h)

Energy and Environmental Protection

(DEEP)

Dam repairs, including state-owned dams

4,000,000

4,000,000

Alterations, renovations, and new construction at state parks and other recreational facilities, including Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements

45,000,000

15,000,000

2 (j), 21 (i)

Developmental Services

Regional facilities: Fire, safety, and environmental improvements for client and staff needs

5,000,000

5,000,000

2 (k), 21 (j)

Mental Health and Addiction Services

Regional facilities: Fire, safety, and environmental improvements for client and staff needs

3,000,000

5,000,000

2 (l),

21 (k)

Education

Regional vocational-technical school system: Building and grounds alterations and improvements, including new and replacement equipment, tools, and supplies needed to update curricula; vehicles; and technology upgrades at all schools

28,000,000

28,000,000

2 (m), 21 (l)

Community College System

All colleges: Facilities alterations and improvements, including fire, safety, energy conservation, and code compliance

4,000,000

5,000,000

All colleges: New and replacement instruction, research, or lab equipment

9,000,000

9,000,000

All colleges: System Technology Initiative

5,000,000

5,000,000

Northwestern: Site remediation, design, and construction for Joyner Building replacement

24,650,786

0

Housatonic: Implement phase III of master plan for renovations and additions to Lafayette Hall

4,669,770

0

Norwalk: Implement phase III of master plan

0

3,720,936

Naugatuck Valley: Founders Hall alterations, improvements, and renovations

0

39,008,382

Tunxis: Implement phase III of master plan

0

4,993,817

2 (n), 21 (m)

Children and Families

Buildings and grounds: Alterations, renovations, and improvements

1,751,000

1,285,000

2 (o), 21(n)

Judicial

State-owned and maintained buildings and grounds: Alterations, renovations, and improvements

5,000,000

5,000,000

Security improvements at state-owned and maintained facilities

1,000,000

1,000,000

Implementation of the Technology Strategic Plan Project

5,000,000

5,000,000

2 (p)

Attorney General

Electronic document software and hardware: Enhancements and upgrades

2,125,000

0

2 (q)

Agricultural Experiment Station

Jenkins Building: Renovations and construction

3,500,000

0

Housing Projects

9, 28

Economic and Community Development

Housing development and rehabilitation

25,000,000

25,000,000

Supportive housing initiatives

30,000,000

0

Grants

13 (a),

32 (a)

Energy and Environmental Protection

Grants for containment, removal, or mitigation of identified hazardous waste disposal sites

10,000,000

10,000,000

Grants to municipalities for open space land acquisition and development for conservation or recreational purposes

5,000,000

5,000,000

13 (b),

32 (b)

Economic and Community Development

Regional Brownfield Redevelopment Loan Fund

25,000,000

25,000,000

13 (c),

32 (c)

Public Health

Grants to community health centers, primary care organizations, and municipalities for equipment purchases and facility renovation, improvement, and expansion

2,000,000

2,000,000

13 (d),

32 (d)

Developmental Services

Grants to private nonprofit organizations for

alterations and improvements to nonresidential facilities

2,000,000

2,000,000

13 (e),

32 (e)

Mental Health and Addiction Services

Grants to private, nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations for community-based residential and outpatient facilities: Purchases, repairs, alterations, and improvements

5,000,000

5,000,000

13 (f),

32 (f)

Transportation

Grants for improvements to ports and marinas, including dredging and navigational direction. FY 12 authorization reserves $1 million for a study of the strategy for economic development in the New Haven, New London, and Bridgeport ports.

6,000,000

25,000,000

13 (g),

32 (g)

Social Services

Grants for neighborhood facilities, child day care projects, elderly centers, multipurpose human resource centers, shelter facilities for domestic violence victims, and food distribution facilities

10,000,000

10,000,000

13 (h)

Education

Grants for Sheff magnet school program start-up costs: Purchasing a building or portable classrooms, leasing space, and purchasing equipment, including computers and classroom furniture, provided that title to any such building that ceases to be used as an interdistrict magnet school may revert to the state as the education commissioner determines.

6,250,000

0

13 (i),

32 (h)

Children and Families

Grants for residential facilities, group homes, shelters, and permanent family residences for construction, alteration, repairs, and improvements

5,000,000

5,000,000

EFFECTIVE DATE: FY 12 authorizations are effective July 1, 2011 and FY 13 authorizations are effective July 1, 2012.

39-45 — AUTHORIZATION FOR LEGISLATIVE MANAGEMENT

The act authorizes up to $9 million in GO bonds for FY 11 to the Office of Legislative Management for capital equipment, information technology system upgrades, and infrastructure repair and improvement. It requires any balance of the bond proceeds that exceed the project cost to be credited to the General Fund.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

46 — GROTON BONDS FOR THAMES STREET REHABILITATION PROGRAM

The act validates the results of a Groton referendum on May 2, 2011 that is otherwise valid except for the town's failure to publish timely notice of it. The referendum concerned an appropriation for costs related to the Thames Street Rehabilitation Program and authorizing bonds, notes, and temporary notes to defray the cost of the appropriation. The act also validates the actions of Groton officials taken in reliance on the referendum's results and makes them effective as of the date taken.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

47 — NORWICH SEWER PROJECT BONDS

The act validates an ordinance approved by the Norwich city council on October 19, 2009 authorizing $1. 6 million in revenue bonds and $800,000 in GO bonds to finance the Newton Street Area sewer project. It authorizes Norwich to issue and sell the bonds and makes them valid obligations of the city and its Department of Public Utilities. It also validates any proceedings or acts taken or omitted in adopting the ordinance, authorizing the project, and issuing the bonds.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

48 — CANAAN BONDS

By law, municipal bonds must mature, or the final sinking fund payment for such bonds must occur, no more than 20 years after the bonds are issued. This act supersedes the statute to double the maximum term to 40 years for bonds issued by the town of Canaan to evidence a loan from the U. S. Department of Agriculture for the cost of designing, building, and equipping a fire station housing emergency equipment.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

49-60 — TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS

This act authorizes STO bonds for FY 12 and FY 13 for transportation-related projects, including “Fix-It-First” state road and bridge repair programs, Department of Transportation (DOT) capital improvements and highway maintenance projects, and capital projects for ports and aviation and public transportation. The bonds are payable from the Special Transportation Fund and are subject to the regular procedures for issuing such bonds.

Table 2 lists the amounts and purposes of the act's STO bond authorizations.

Table 2: STO Bond Authorizations for DOT Projects

AUTHORIZED PROGRAM AREAS

FY 12

FY 13

Bureau of Engineering and Highway Operations

Interstate highway program

$13,000,000

$14,950,000

Urban systems projects

8,500,000

8,500,000

Intrastate highway program

44,000,000

44,000,000

Environmental compliance, soil and groundwater remediation, hazardous materials abatement, demolition, salt shed construction and renovation, storage tank replacement, and environmental emergency response at or near state-owned property or related to DOT operations

13,000,000

11,205,000

State bridge improvement, rehabilitation, and replacement

33,000,000

33,000,000

Capital resurfacing and related construction

137,800,000

68,900,000

Fix-It-First road repair program

39,146,000

57,600,000

Fix-It-First bridge repair program

66,150,000

64,129,000

Improvement and repair of a rail freight bridge between Hartford and East Hartford

3,000,200

0

Bureau of Aviation and Ports

Reconstruction and improvements to the warehouse and State Pier in New London, including site and ferry slip improvements

780,000

6,100,000

Developing and improving general aviation airports, including grants to municipal airports, excluding Bradley International Airport

2,000,000

2,000,000

Bureau of Public Transportation

Bus and rail facilities and equipment, including rights-of-way, other property acquisition, and related projects

156,722,000

167,000,000

Demolition of 175,000 square feet of obsolete mill structures related to the Barnum train station project in Bridgeport

2,500,000

0

Construction of a catwalk over the railroad tracks separating the Columbus Circle area from McAuliffe Park in East Hartford

230,000

0

Bureau of Administration

DOT facilities

$37,520,993

$16,555,168

STO bonds, cost of issuance and debt service reserve

21,300,000

21,300,000

EFFECTIVE DATE: FY 12 authorizations are effective July 1, 2011 and FY 13 authorizations are effective July 1, 2012.

61-75, 91-92, & 116 — BOND AUTHORIZATIONS FOR STATUTORY PROGRAMS AND GRANTS

This act authorizes new GO bonding for FY 12 and FY 13 for various capital programs, including school construction, clean water, and economic development projects; the Local Capital Improvement Program (LOCIP); and farmland preservation. It also authorizes bonds for development of a University of Connecticut technology park.

It establishes a new program to provide grants to allow municipalities, on or after October 1, 2011, to jointly buy or lease equipment or vehicles for required government functions or services. It authorizes up to $10 million per year in GO bonds for FY 12 and FY 13 for the grants.

In addition to the GO bond authorizations, the act authorizes revenue bonds over the two years for Clean Water Fund loans and reallocates $16. 4 million in funds under the Connecticut State University System's 2020 program (CSUS 2020) for a renovation and addition to the Buley Library at Southern Connecticut State University.

It also merges three existing programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in state buildings and transfers responsibility for the programs to DEEP. Under prior law, each program had a separate bond authorization, funded different types of projects, and was administered by a different agency.

61-66, 71-75, & 91-92 — New Authorizations for Statutory Programs

The act authorizes new bonding for FY 12 and FY 13 as shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Statutory Bond Authorizations for FY 12 and FY 13

Agency

Purpose/Fund

FY 12

FY 13

61

Office of Policy and Management

Economic and community development project grants (Urban Act)

$50,000,000

$50,000,000

62

Office of Policy and Management

Small Town Economic Assistance Program (STEAP)

20,000,000

20,000,000

63

Office of Policy and Management

Capital Equipment Purchase Fund

0

22,900,000

64

Office of Policy and Management

Local Capital Improvement Program (LOCIP)

30,000,000

30,000,000

65

Construction Services1

School construction projects

523,000,000

584,000,000

66

Education

School construction interest subsidy grants

13,400,000

8,300,000

71

Agriculture

Farmland preservation

10,000,000

10,000,000

72

Environmental Protection

Clean Water Fund grants

92,600,000

94,000,000

73

Environmental Protection

Clean Water Fund loans (revenue bonds)

233,420,000

238,360,000

74

Economic and Community Development

Manufacturing Assistance Act

40,000,000

40,000,000

75

Office of Policy and Management

Intertown Capital Equipment Purchase Incentive Program (see below)

10,000,000

10,000,000

91

Economic and Community Development

Housing Trust Fund

25,000,000

25,000,000

92

University of Connecticut

Development of a technology park and related buildings at UConn, including planning, design, construction and improvements, land acquisition, equipment purchases, on- and off-site utilities, and infrastructure improvements (see below)

18,000,000

154,500,000

1PA 11-48 transfers responsibility for paying school construction grants from the State Department of Education to the Department of Construction Services.

EFFECTIVE DATE: FY 12 authorizations are effective July 1, 2011 and FY 13 authorizations are effective July 1, 2012.

67 — CSUS 2020 Project Reallocation

The act adds a project for additions and renovations to Buley Library at Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU) to Phase I of the CSUS 2020 system-wide capital improvement plan. It funds the project by reallocating $16,386,585 in GO bond authorizations from two existing SCSU projects: (1) new academic laboratory building/parking garage (reduced by $11,482,000) and (2) code compliance/infrastructure improvements (reduced by $4,904,585). The reallocation allows SCSU to complete the Buley Library renovation and supports work on its new addition.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

68-70 & 116 — Renewable Energy and Energy Services Projects in State Buildings

The act merges three programs with separate GO bond authorizations for funding energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in businesses and state buildings. It does so by (1) limiting the program to state buildings, (2) requiring all three authorizations to fund the same types of projects, (3) transferring responsibility for all three programs to DEEP, and (4) eliminating separate program requirements (see Table 4).

Table 4: Merging Energy Programs for State Buildings

PROGRAM

BOND AUTHORIZATION

TYPES OF PROJECTS

ADMINISTERING AGENCY

Prior Law

The Act

Prior Law

The Act

Energy services projects in state buildings

( 16a-38m)

$13,000,000

Energy efficiency measures under the strategic plan for improving energy management in state buildings

Energy efficiency measures under the strategic plan for improving energy management in state buildings

Renewable energy in state buildings

Combined heat and power (cogeneration) in state buildings

Public Works

Energy and Environmental Protection

Clean and Distributive Generation Grant program

( 16a-38n & 16a-38o)

20,000,000

Clean and distributive generation projects in businesses and state buildings generated from a Class I renewable energy source

Public Utility Control

Energy and Environmental Protection

Renewable energy or combined heat and power projects

( 16a-38p)

$10,000,000

Renewable energy or combined heat and power projects in state buildings

Connecticut Innovations, Inc.

Energy and Environmental Protection

The act also eliminates requirements, formerly applicable to one or more of the separate programs, that:

1. bond funds be used only to pay the net project cost or the balance after applying available private incentives;

2. the funds be available through the Renewable Energy Investment Fund; and

3. the state building where the project is performed (a) be certified or in the process of being certified in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program, (b) be in the process of becoming LEED silver-rated, or (c) have received or be in the process of receiving a two-globe rating in the Green Globes USA design program.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

75 — Intertown Capital Equipment Purchase Incentive Program

The act establishes a new grant program, administered by the Office of Policy and Management (OPM) secretary, to help municipalities jointly buy or lease needed vehicles or capital equipment starting October 1, 2011.

The program provides grants to pay up to 50% or $250,000, whichever is less, of the cost of buying or leasing (1) a maintenance vehicle, pickup truck, tractor, truck tractor, utility trailer, or similar vehicle or (2) any other equipment, including data processing equipment with a unit price under $1,000, that has an expected remaining useful life of at least five years from the purchase or lease date. The municipality must use the vehicle or equipment to perform or deliver a required government function or service.

The act requires the OPM secretary, by September 1, 2011, to develop guidelines establishing:

1. application and administrative procedures for the program;

2. criteria for spending the grants and for allocating them among the municipalities jointly acquiring the equipment; and

3. priorities for awarding grants, including limits on how often a municipality may apply, or the dollar amount it may receive, in a given time period.

By October 1, 2011 and each year thereafter, the secretary must issue a notice that the grants are available and solicit proposals for funding. Eligible municipalities may apply for grants when and how the secretary prescribes. The secretary must review the applications and determine the vehicles or equipment to fund and the grant amounts in accordance with program guidelines.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

92 — UCONN Technology Park

The act gives UConn authority to supervise all aspects of the project to develop a technology park, including off-campus improvements. It requires UConn to work in consultation with the town of Mansfield concerning on- and off-site utilities financed under the act's bond authorization.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

83, 84, 86, & 87 — CANCELLATIONS AND REALLOCATION OF FUNDS FOR NEW PUBLIC HEALTH LABORATORY

The act cancels parts of two authorizations for a new public health laboratory and allows reallocation of some of the funds. It:

1. cancels $630,250 of a $5 million authorization for development of a new public health lab and allows the remaining $4,369,750 funds to be used for a laboratory addition for DEEP in Windsor; and

2. cancels $2,215,700 of an authorization for the new health lab and related costs, reducing it from $32,785,900 to $30,570,200.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

CHANGES IN EXISTING AUTHORIZATIONS

76-82 — Authorizations Transferred to New Agencies

In conformity with acts consolidating state agencies, the act transfers responsibility for existing bond authorizations for the following capital projects related to state buildings and property from the Department of Public Works (DPW) to the Department of Construction Services (DCS):

1. various security improvements;

2. removal or encapsulation of asbestos in state buildings;

3. infrastructure repairs and improvements, improvements to state-owned buildings and grounds, and preservation of unoccupied buildings and grounds;

4. capital construction, improvements, repairs, renovations, and land acquisition at fire training schools; and

5. development and implementation of a plan to reduce the number of state-owned and -leased surface parking lots in Hartford.

In addition, it transfers responsibility for existing bond authorizations for the following information technology projects from the Department of Information Technology (DOIT) to the Department of Administrative Services (DAS):

1. development and implementation of the Connecticut Education Network,

2. planning and design for a state data center, and

3. development and implementation of systems to comply with the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2012

85 & 88 — Corrections in Prior Authorizations for Housing Development and Rehabilitation Projects

The act makes two corrections in prior authorizations to the Department of Economic and Community Development for housing development and rehabilitation projects. It changes the amount authorized for specific projects in PA 07-7, June Special Session ( 28), from $9 million to $10 million to match the total authorization for all housing development and rehabilitation projects specified in the preceding section of that act. It also corrects the names of two New Britain housing development projects authorized under PA 10-44 to receive $15 million from a previous $21 million authorization.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

89 — Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Water Pollution Grants

The act expands the permissible uses for a $16 million authorization to DEP to allow the department to use the funds for grants to state and regional planning agencies and municipalities for water pollution control projects. Under prior law and the act, DEP can also use these funds for grants to:

1. contain, remove, or mitigate identified hazardous waste disposal sites;

2. municipalities for new water mains to replace supply from contaminated wells;

3. identify, investigate, contain, remove, or mitigate industrial sites in urban areas;

4. municipalities to acquire land for public parks, recreational and water quality improvements, and water mains and water pollution control projects, including sewers; and

5. municipalities to provide potable water.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

90 — Authorization for Northwestern Community College

The act expands the permissible uses of an FY 10 authorization of up to $1,633,611 for replacing the Joyner Building at Northwestern Community College to include property acquisition as well as site remediation, design, and construction.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2011

93 — SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

The act authorizes $284. 9 million in grant commitments for 22 new local school construction, vocational agriculture (vo-ag), and interdistrict magnet school projects. It also reauthorizes and changes grant commitments for five previously authorized projects with significant changes in cost and scope, three for the first time and two for the second. (By law, districts are limited to two reauthorizations. ) Of the five reauthorizations, two are reauthorized at reduced, and three at increased, cost. The total net increase in grant commitments for the reauthorizations is $1. 85 million.

New Project Authorizations

Table 5 shows the 22 new school projects the act authorizes. Projects are listed alphabetically by district or entity.

Table 5: New School Construction Projects Authorized

District/Entity

School

Project

Estimated Cost

Estimated Grant

Bridgeport

Black Rock

School

Extension & alteration/site purchase

$12,000,000

$9,385,200

Bridgeport

Harding High School

New school

78,254,163

61,202,581

Bridgeport

Central High School

Extension & alteration

73,418,940

57,420,953

Bridgeport

Dunbar School

Alteration/energy conservation

8,807,099

6,888,032

Capitol Region Education Council (CREC)

CREC Academy of Aerospace

New interdistrict magnet school/ site purchase

67,393,000

64,023,350

CREC

CREC Discovery Academy

New interdistrict magnet school/ site purchase

31,975,000

30,376,250

CREC

CREC Museum Academy

New interdistrict magnet school/ site purchase

31,961,000

30,362,950

Cheshire

Cheshire High School

Energy conservation

209,101

90,353

Cheshire

Norton School

Energy conservation

500,000

205,350

Connecticut Science Center

Connecticut Science Center

Alteration/energy conservation/ interdistrict magnet school

1,500,000

1,425,000

Fairfield

Fairfield Woods Middle School

Extension & alteration

24,453,000

6,374,897

Milford

Pumpkin Delight School

Code violation

500,000

194,650

Milford

Jonathan Law High School

Extension & alteration/energy conservation

5,500,000

2,141,150

Milford

Joseph A. Foran High School

Extension & alteration/energy conservation

10,400,000

4,048,720

New Britain

Diloreto Magnet School

Extension & alteration

10,000,000

7,929,000

Oxford

Great Oak Middle School

Alteration/energy conservation

910,791

465,141

Region 4

John Winthrop Middle School

Energy conservation

994,000

426,028

Region 14

Nonnewaug High School

Vo-ag center alteration

192,500

182,875

Region 19

E. O. Smith High School

Vo-ag center equipment

590,062

560,559

Stratford

Bunnell High School

Alteration/code violation

1,357,000

654,210

Weston

Weston High School

Energy conservation

1,175,460

251,901

Weston

Weston Middle School

Energy conservation/code violation

1,395,150

298,981

Reauthorized Projects

Table 6 lists the five projects proposed for reauthorization because of a significant (more than 10%) change in cost or scope.

Table 6: Reauthorization of Previously Authorized Projects

District

School

Project

Prior Grant Authorization

New Grant Authorization

Change

FIRST REAUTHORIZATION

Cromwell

Cromwell Middle School

Alteration/ energy conservation

$1,248,987

$622,212

($626,775)

Cromwell

Edna Stevens School

Alteration/ energy conservation

1,873,734

507,607

(1,366,127)

Waterbury

Waterbury Career Academy

New school

50,163,802

53,576,883

3,413,081

SECOND REAUTHORIZATION

Montville

Leonard J. Tyl School

Energy conservation/code violation

$676,947

$887,461

$210,514

West Hartford

King Philip Middle School

Alteration

589,960

808,072

218,112

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

94-99 & 101-115 — School Construction Notwithstandings

The act exempts specified school construction projects from various statutory and regulatory requirements to allow them to qualify for state grants. These exemptions are referred to as “notwithstanding” provisions. Table 7 summarizes each exemption and any applicable conditions.

Table 7: Notwithstanding Provisions for Local School Projects

District/Entity

Project (s)

Exemption, Waiver, or Other Change

94

Bridgeport

Projects authorized between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2016

Exemption for limit on cost of site acquisition and remediation of a brownfield if that cost is less than the cost of a reasonable alternative site, as determined by the DCS commissioner, in consultation with the education commissioner and the Office of Brownfield Remediation and Development.

DCS, in consultation with the commissioner and the office, must report to the Education and Finance committees by June 30, 2017 on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the exemption.

95

Bristol

Bristol Central High and

Bristol Eastern High: Alterations

Change to a renovation project.

96

CREC

7 new interdistrict magnet schools

State must pay the initial cost of CREC's local shares for these projects.

After audit of completed projects, DCS must calculate the local share of each and determine a 20-year repayment schedule, including a fixed interest rate as determined by the state treasurer over the repayment period.

SDE must withhold annual repayments from the interdistrict magnet school grants payable to CREC for operating the schools.

SDE must transfer withheld amounts annually to the School Building Construction Fund.

97

Two Rivers Magnet Academy governance committee

Two Rivers Magnet Middle School: New magnet school

Forgives repayment of $1,568,672 in grant funds received for reimbursement of ineligible costs.

Governance committee members repay $268,600 of the ineligible costs on a pro rata basis.

98

Goodwin College

Connecticut River Academy: New magnet school

Reduces authorized project cost by $1. 2 million

99

Cromwell

Woodside Intermediate School: New school

Waives repayment of any portion of grant already paid prior to the act's passage based on enrollment figure of 494.

SDE not responsible for making any more grant payments based on that figure.

101

Hartford

Capital Preparatory Magnet School: New magnet school

Allow district to change the project to accommodate change from a grade 6-12 to pre-k-to-12 school, provided:

there is no increase in total project costs authorized,

the education commissioner reviews and approves all construction plans and specifications for the pre-k-12 school, and

the education commissioner approves Hartford's modified enrollment projections for the pre-k-12 school.

102

Ledyard

Juliet W. Long Elementary School: Asbestos removal

Waives requirements for Bureau of School Facilities plan approval before bid, provided bureau approves plans and specifications.

103

Ledyard

Ledyard High School: Asbestos removal

Waives requirements for Bureau of School Facilities plan approval before bid, provided bureau approves plans and specifications.

104

New London

Interdistrict magnet school district

Extends, from June 30, 2012 to June 30, 2015, the deadline for New London's out-of-district student enrollment to equal at least 15% of its total districtwide enrollment as a condition of receiving state operating grants.

Requires the districtwide enrollment to be measured based on the total number of students enrolled in New London public schools.

105

West Haven

West Haven High School: Alteration and energy conservation

Waives requirements for Bureau of School Facilities plan approval before bid, provided bureau approves plans and specifications.

Waives competitive bidding requirements for orders and contracts applicable to project.

Makes district eligible for payment for any change orders not submitted within statutory time limit.

106

Woodstock

Woodstock Elementary School: Asbestos removal

Waives requirement for Bureau of School Facilities plan approval before bid, provided bureau approves plans and specifications.

107

Winchester

Pearson Middle School: Code violations

Waives requirement for Bureau of School Facilities plan approval before bid, provided bureau approves plans and specifications.

108

Enfield

Stowe Elementary School

Waives requirement to repay the unamortized balance of a school construction grant when redirecting a school building to other use.

Waiver continues while Enfield leases the building to CREC for temporary use as the Public Safety Magnet School.

Period for which CREC uses the facility to be credited towards time Enfield uses it for another school use.

109

Groton

Catherine Kolnaski Magnet School: New school

Exempts project from space standards for grant calculation purposes.

110

New Haven

Clinton Avenue School: Renovations

New Haven not responsible for returning any portion of grant already paid prior to the act's passage based on enrollment figure of 680.

SDE not required to make any more grant payments based on that figure.

111

Hartford

M. D. Fox Elementary School: Alteration, energy conservation, code violation, and renovation

Waives requirement that a renovation project cost less than a new building, provided project cost does not exceed approved cost of $54,337,500.

112

Danbury

Danbury Head Start Center: Extension/alteration

Changes project scope to site acquisition and new construction.

113

Amistad Academy Charter School

Amistad Academy Charter School: Purchase and renovations

Increases authorized project cost by $2. 75 million, from $31. 5 million to $34. 25 million.

114

Region 6

Wamogo Regional High School: Vo-ag/extension and alteration

Waives newspaper notice requirement in competitive bidding procedure to allow alternate public bidding invitation for costs up to $419,200.

115

Wilton

Cider Mill School: Renovation/ extension

Waives repayment of any portion of grant already paid prior to the act's passage based on square footage of 145,300.

SDE not responsible for making any additional grant payments based on that square footage figure.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

100 — Diversity School Project Grants

The act requires the DCS commissioner, in consultation with the SDE, to provide special school construction grants for school districts that have one or more schools with minority enrollments that exceed the district-wide percentage of minority enrollment for the same grades by more than 25%. The grant must reimburse such districts for 80% of the reasonable capital costs for school construction projects, including purchase, construction, extension, replacement, leasing, major alteration of, or buying equipment for, diversity schools open to all students within the district. Under the act, minorities are students whose race is defined as other than white or whose ethnicity is defined as Latino or Hispanic for purposes of the federal census.

To qualify for the grant, (1) the diversity school must be open to all students living in the district for the purpose of correcting the existing minority enrollment disparity and (2) the school board must demonstrate that it has made a good faith effort to correct the disparity, as determined by the education commissioner. An eligible district must apply for grants according to the school construction grant application procedure and include with the application evidence that it is developing policies to let its residents know that the diversity school is open to all eligible students living in the district. The DCS commissioner must approve only those applications that the education commissioner finds will help correct the district's enrollment disparity. Diversity school projects must meet all requirements for school construction projects receiving state grants, but the act allows the DCS commissioner to waive any of these requirements for good cause.

The act requires the education commissioner to conduct a programmatic audit of each diversity school within five years after it opens. If the commissioner determines the school board has not made significant progress to correct the district's minority enrollment disparity, the commissioner must notify the board that, unless there is significant progress within one year after the audit, it may be responsible for repaying the difference between the 80% reimbursement and the district's regular school construction project reimbursement rate.

If, after the one-year period, the commissioner determines there has not been significant progress, the school district must repay the extra project reimbursement. Under the act, it must do so by paying the amount of the difference in equal annual payments over a 20-year schedule, as calculated by the DCS commissioner. The repayment must include interest at a fixed rate determined by the state treasurer and applied to the outstanding principal at the time of each payment.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

OLR Tracking: JSL: JKL: PF: ro