Topic:
AGRICULTURE (GENERAL); LEGISLATIVE INTENT; FOOD LAW;
Location:
FOOD PRODUCTS;
Scope:
Background; Connecticut laws/regulations;

OLR Research Report


January 25, 2002

 

2000-R-0106

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF STATUTE CONCERNING THE ENRICHMENT OF CERTAIN GRAIN PRODUCTS

 

By: Daniel Duffy, Principal Analyst

You asked for a review of the legislative history of the state statute concerning the enrichment of certain grain products to determine (1) when the “enrichment” requirement was established and (2) if legislature adopted it as a state initiative or to comply with a federal mandate.

SUMMARY

The law was adopted in 1972 to require designated grain products to be enriched. It establishes enrichment standards that are the same as those in federal law, as amended from time to time. The law is not mandated by federal law. It is a state mandate based on a federal standard contained in regulations. According to the legislative transcript, Connecticut joined from 38 to 40 other states when it decided to adopt the federal standards.

The legislature also amended the law in 1974 and 1984, but these amendments were technical and did not change the law's substance.

THE CURRENT LAW (CGS SEC. 21A-28)

The law prohibits manufacturing, mixing, compounding, selling, or offering for sale flour, bread, corn meal or grits, rice, and macaroni for human consumption unless (1) it has been enriched, prior to retail sale, in compliance with appropriate federal regulations and (2) the person can show evidence of compliance as required by regulations issued by the state consumer protection commissioner.

Table 1 lists the products and the relevant federal regulation as identified by the state statute. By state law, compliance must be with federal law as amended from time to time.

PRODUCT

FEDERAL REGULATION

Flour

21 CFR Part 137

Bread and Rolls

21 CFR Part136

Corn meal and grits

21 CFR Part137

Rice

21 CFR Part137

Macaroni

21 CFR Part139

1972, PA 72

Representative Cohen introduced the bill (HB 5217) in the House of Representatives on March 28, 1972. Cohen stated that the bill's purpose is to “put back necessary ingredients into such important foods as flour, corn meal, rice, and grits.” Representative Kablik supported the bill. He stated that 38 or 39 states had already adopted the enrichment standards. Kablik pointed out that the bill is drafted in a way that will keep state standards current with federal standards.

Senator Prete introduced the bill on April 5, 1972. He stated that it would provide for the enrichment of certain grain products and would put Connecticut in concurrence with 40 other states. He described it as good sound public health legislation.

PA 73-377

Representative Kablik introduced the bill (HB 8886) in the house on April 25, 1973. He described the bill as a technical one that did three things: (1) required macaroni products to be enriched, (2) allowed the enrichment to occur at any time prior to retail sale, and (3) authorized the consumer protection commissioner to request proof of enrichment.

Senator Berry introduced the bill on May 7, 1973 with little comment. Senator Hellier introduced an amendment that would exempt products “stone ground by water power and unsifted.” Hellier explained that this would allow a North Stonington producer of johnnycake meal to continue production.

Representative Kablik introduced the amended bill in the house on May 9, 1973. He explained that the amendment was necessary only because it was a “directive to the Commissioner that he read the bill the way it was originally written.”

DD:ro